INSTRUCTIONAL GOALS

6010

INSTRUCTIONAL GOALS                        6010

The focus of the Meriden Public Schools is on the student. The educational development of the student is the central concern of the Board’s policies and the administrative regulations. While the teacher is the key figure in carrying out the district’s responsibility in the educational process, the teacher alone cannot effectively achieve all the objectives of education. The purpose of the various administrative departments is to provide teachers with a variety of tools and specialized assistance in developing and carrying out programs which will meet the needs of students. The Board will seek to provide the facilities, personnel, equipment, and materials necessary for the education of all students for whom it is responsible.

It shall be the responsibility of each school’s staff, under the direction of the principal, to have specific educational objectives consistent with the Board’s educational goals.

The educational goals and objectives of the school system will serve as criteria by which curriculum guides are established, content outlined, learning materials selected, instructional procedures and educational technology developed, and tests prepared.

Cross Reference:

Policy 0110 (Educational Philosophy)

Policy 0200 (School District Goals)

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended December 6, 2016

Previous Policy Number: HA

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HA

SCHOOL CLOSINGS

6110

SCHOOL CLOSINGS                            6110

The Superintendent is empowered to close the schools or adjust hours in the event of hazardous weather or other emergencies which threaten the health or safety of students and personnel.

In making the decision to close schools, the Superintendent shall consider many factors, including the following principal ones relating to the fundamental concern for the safety and health of children:

weather conditions, both existing and predicted;

driving, traffic and parking conditions affecting public and private transportation facilities;

and the actual occurrence or imminent possibility of any emergency condition which would make the operation of schools difficult or dangerous.

Students, parents and staff shall be informed early in each school year of the procedures which will be used to notify them in case of emergency closings. When schools are closed to students for emergency reasons, staff members shall comply with regulations in reporting for work.

Legal Reference:

Connecticut General Statutes, Section 10-16

Cross Reference:

Policy 6112 (School Day)

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016

Previous Policy Number: EB2.2

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: EB2.2

Procedures for Closing School Due to Inclement Weather Conditions

6110.1 (R)

Procedures for Closing School Due to Inclement Weather Conditions 6110.1(R)

When the decision to close school has been made because of inclement weather or other hazardous condition,   Announcements will be released for immediate broadcast by radio stations and television. In the absence of the Superintendent, the Assistant Superintendent is authorized to make such school closing decisions.

Parents, students and employees are asked to refrain from calling the central office for information on emergency school closings.

Localized conditions within Meriden may make attendance at the regular time hazardous at certain schools. Parents must exercise their own discretion in sending children in such cases. In such situations, a written excuse from the parent will enable the student to make up any homework missed.

An Interschool Emergency Communication System will be updated annually and sent to all schools.



Approved April 28, 1981

Amended December 6, 2016


Previous Policy Number: EB2.2R

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: EB2.2R

SCHOOL YEAR

6111

SCHOOL YEAR                                6111

The standard school year for the Meriden Public Schools shall be consistent with the requirements of Connecticut State Law.  Effective July 1, 2016 and annually thereafter, the Board shall adopt the uniform regional school calendar.

Legal Reference:

Connecticut General Statutes, Sections 10-15, 10-66q

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016

Previous Policy Number: HB

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HB

SCHOOL DAY

6112

SCHOOL DAY 6112

School hours established for the Meriden Public Schools shall be consistent with Connecticut State Law.

Hours for attendance for the various grades or schools and for admission to the grounds and to the buildings shall be determined by the Superintendent with the approval of the Board.

Any major changes in school day schedules other than emergencies, including the provision for released time, shall be subject to Board approval.

Legal References:

Connecticut General Statutes Sections 10-15, 10-16

Cross Reference:

Policy 6110 (School Closings)

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016


Previous Policy Number: HC

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HC

Partial Days

6112.1 (R)

 

Daily Recess for Elementary Schools 6112.2(R)

Staff members are to plan daily recess periods for elementary school students.  Recess is to be at least twenty (20) minutes in duration and is to be well supervised by the assigned teacher(s). Structured activities are often the best approach to recess.  The Physical Education Curriculum contains recommended activities for primary grade students that can be incorporated into the recess period.

Because of weather or other unusual circumstances, there will be times when daily recess will not be possible.  Such instances are to be kept to a minimum and there is to be agreement at the building level as to the reasons why this should occur.  In cases of inclement weather, indoor activities are to be substituted for outdoor games, etc., as long as other classes are not disturbed.

Legal References:

Connecticut General Statutes § 10-221o

Approved April 28, 1981
Amended January 4, 2011 

Amended December 6, 2016

Previous Policy Number: HC-R(2)






Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HC-R(3

Daily Recess for Elementary Schools

6112.2 (R)

Staff members are to plan daily recess periods for students.  Recess is to be at least fifteen (15) minutes in duration and is to be well supervised by the assigned teacher(s). Structured activities are often the best approach to recess.  The Physical Education Curriculum contains recommended activities for primary grade students that can be incorporated into the recess period.

Because of weather or other unusual circumstances, there will be times when daily recess will not be possible.  Such instances are to be kept to a minimum and there is to be agreement at the building level as to the reasons why this should occur.  In cases of inclement weather, indoor activities are to be substituted for outdoor games, etc., as long as other classes are not disturbed.

 

Approved 4/28/1981
Amended 1/4/2011 

Approved 1/4/2011
Previous Policy Number: HC-R(2)

Daily Recess for Elementary Schools

6112.2(R)

Daily Recess for Elementary Schools 6112.2(R)

Staff members are to plan daily recess periods for elementary school students.  Recess is to be at least twenty (20) minutes in duration and is to be well supervised by the assigned teacher(s). Structured activities are often the best approach to recess.  The Physical Education Curriculum contains recommended activities for primary grade students that can be incorporated into the recess period.

Because of weather or other unusual circumstances, there will be times when daily recess will not be possible.  Such instances are to be kept to a minimum and there is to be agreement at the building level as to the reasons why this should occur.  In cases of inclement weather, indoor activities are to be substituted for outdoor games, etc., as long as other classes are not disturbed.

Legal References:

Connecticut General Statutes § 10-221o

Approved April 28, 1981
Amended January 4, 2011 

Amended December 6, 2016

Previous Policy Number: HC-R(2)

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HC-R(2)

EMERGENCY PLANS

6114

EMERGENCY PLANS                            6114

The Board recognizes the need for preparation and plans regarding actions to be taken before, during and after an emergency to minimize the effects of any disaster and to protect the lives of the students entrusted to its care. It realizes that schools may be used for temporary housing in case of catastrophe, including civil disorders.

The Board authorizes the Superintendent to develop and implement a school disaster plan that will provide as much protection as possible for students while at school and on their way to and from school, and to provide adequate instruction so that the school emergency plan may be carried out with the greatest possible speed and safety.

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016


Previous Policy Number: EB2

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: EB2

Drills

6114.1

Drills                                        6114.1

Each principal shall conduct fire and crisis response drills in accordance with Connecticut state law.

Legal Reference:

 

Connecticut General Statutes Section 10-231

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016


Previous Policy Number: EB2.1

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: EB2.1

Procedures for Fire Drills

6114.12 (R)

Procedures for Fire and Crisis Response Drills 6114.12(R)

All schools shall have written emergency fire and crisis response drill procedures. The reason for these drills is to familiarize the school staff with these procedures so that the staff and students will react properly in case of a real emergency. Every drill must be conducted as if there were a fire or other emergency in the building.

Speed is not the most important factor in a drill. Evacuation of the building must be accomplished in an orderly manner without distractions. This is necessary so that everyone will be alert to heed a change in directions which might be required if one of the regular exits is blocked. Straight, quiet lines are mandatory.

Teachers are to remain with their class and must walk out of the building and down the street with their students.

Teachers must have their attendance record with them during a drill. All students must be accounted for.

Periodically a modification will be made in fire drills to emphasize the importance of smoke and the need to stay below it.

Principals shall include a statement in their fire and crisis response drill reports showing the dates on which fire and crisis response drills were held.

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended December 6, 2016

Previous Policy Number: EB2.1R




Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: EB2.1R

Bomb Threats

6114.3

Each principal shall handle bomb threats in accordance with established procedures.

Approved September 20, 1988

Amended:  December 6, 2016

 

Previous Policy Number: EB2.3

 

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: EB2.3

Bomb Threat Telephone Call Form

6114.31 (E)

View / download BOMB THREAT TELEPHONE CALL FORM (printable PDF)

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: EB2.3-E

Handling of Bomb Threats at the Schools

6114.32 (R)

Click the link to access the instructions to handle bomb threats at the schools: Handling of Bomb Threats at the Schools

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: EB2.3-R

Flag Displays

6115.1

The national flag will be displayed in classrooms and on school grounds in accordance with Connecticut State Statutes.

Custodians shall be responsible for the display of the national flag on school buildings during the proper hours when school is in session. No flag shall be left flying overnight without proper illumination.

Legal Reference:

Connecticut General Statutes, Section 10-230

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HN1

ORGANIZATION OF INSTRUCTION

6119

The Board is responsible for public education of students, kindergarten through grade twelve, throughout the Meriden Public Schools. The Board is also responsible for adult education under certain circumstances in accordance with state and federal law.

The grouping and housing of instructional levels in school facilities shall be according to plans developed by the Superintendent and approved by the Board.

Legal Reference:

Connecticut General Statutes, Section10-240

Cross Reference:

Policy 6119.1 (School Organization)

Policy 6130 (Adult Education)

Policy 6120.3 (Career and Vocational Education)

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016

 

Previous Policy Number: HD

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HD

School Organization

6119.1

The Board adopts the organizational plan of 6-3-4 for the Meriden Public Schools, with grades Kindergarten through five in the elementary schools, grades 6 through 8 in the middle schools, and grades 9, 10, 11 and 12 in the high schools.

Cross Reference:

Policy 6119 (Organization of Instruction)

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016

 

Previous Policy Number: HD1

 

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HD1

Procedures for the Articulation Process Between Grades Five to Six and Grades Eight to Nine

6119.12 (R)

Grades 5 - 6

Orientation is held in late May or early June. Groups of approximately fifty students are bused to each of the middle schools. Fifth grade students tour the building from about 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and have an opportunity to meet with the administration, teachers, nurses, counselors and social workers.

Students have lunch at the respective middle school with middle school students and spend some time seeing classes in session. There is a period of questions and answers after the session.

A general orientation assembly is held in September and parents are always invited.

Grades 8 - 9

Developing a challenging, yet realistic high school program of studies requires much exploration, self-analysis, guidance and thoughtful planning. Cooperation between parents, teachers and counselors is essential for assisting students to make the appropriate decisions for achieving their long-range goals.

In coordination with the middle and high school counseling and teaching staffs, the following timetable for facilitating the programming process has been developed.

By the end of January - Distribution of Program of Studies Booklets

Assemblies at the middle or high schools, conducted by high school counselors, to review general curriculum offerings and graduation requirements.

Each February - Parent/Student Orientation Night at High Schools

Actual student program selection for ninth grade in small groups with assistance of middle and high school counselors.

Early March - Review of Student Programs on an Individual Basis with Middle School Counselors

Review and acceptance or adjustment of program of studies by parents.

End of March - Deadline for Return of Signed Student Programs to the Middle School Guidance Department

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HD1-R

Ranges for Instructional Time (Grades One - Six)

6119.2 (R)
  MINUTES PER WEEK
SUBJECT AREA GRADES 1-3 GRADES 4-6
*Art 60-100 60-100
*Music 60-100 60-100
**Career Education 60-90 90-225
**Consumer Education 30-60 45-120
**Health and Safety 60-90 80-225
Language Arts (incl. Reading) 900-1000 450-800
Mathematics 225-300 220-330
*Physical Education 60-150 90-150
Science 75-150 220-300
Social Studies 75-150 220-300

*Includes instruction provided by specialists as well as the classroom teacher.

**Instruction in these areas would be infused into other subject areas.

No specific time recommendations, in minutes, are being made for grades 7-12. At these grade levels, all subjects are scheduled on a period basis.

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HC-R(1)

THE BASIC INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM

6120

The curriculum shall emphasize the basic skills of English, reading, writing and mathematics; along with the social sciences, natural sciences, foreign languages, the arts, physical education, and health education. Such curriculum shall also include and be consistent with all the other school district goals such as the skills of communication, ethical and responsible behavior, respect for others, good standing of economic principles and responsibilities, and the development of decision-making skills. The curriculum shall include instruction in any other subject, skill or area as required by state statute.

Co-curricular activities shall be included in the school program which will foster participation in athletic, musical, dramatic and other socially acceptable maturing endeavors appropriate to the various age levels of the students.

Legal Reference:

Connecticut General Statutes, Section 10-16b

Cross Reference:

Policy 0110 (Educational Philosophy)

Policy 0200 (School District Goals)

Policy 6140 (Curriculum Development)

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016

 

Previous Policy Number: HF1

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HF1

Partisan or Sectarian Instruction

6120.1

Neither partisan nor sectarian instruction shall be allowed in the district’s schools.

Teachers shall be permitted to expose students to information concerning religions and religious beliefs as well as political beliefs and political movements and organizations within the context of the curriculum. However, teachers shall not advocate a particular religion or religious belief nor shall teachers advocate in the classroom particular political beliefs or support of political movements.

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016

 

Previous Policy Number: HF1.1

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HF1.1

Health Education

6120.2

Health Education 6120.2

The Health Program shall present information, skills and knowledge necessary for students to understand and appreciate the functioning and proper care of the human body. Health education shall examine the potential hazards of social and physical problems in an effort to help students make intelligent, viable choices on alternatives of serious personal consequence.

The Board believes that an opportunity for effective health education lies within the public schools because of the opportunity to reach almost all children at an age where positive, lifelong health habits may be engendered because of the availability of qualified personnel to conduct health education programs. The Board is, therefore, committed to a sound comprehensive Health Program as an integral part of each student’s general education.

The Board also recognizes the rights and responsibilities of parents related to health education in general and specifically with regard to instruction on acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and family life education. Therefore, in accordance with state statute, students will be exempt from instruction on these topics upon written request of the parent or guardian.

Legal Reference:

Connecticut General Statutes Sections 10-16b, 10-16e, 10-19

Public Act 14-196, An Act Concerning a State-Wide Sexual Abuse and Assault Awareness Program

Public Act 15-94, An Act Concerning the Inclusion of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training, the Safe Use of Social Media and Computer Programming in the Public School Curriculum

Public Act 16-188, An Act Concerning Education Issues

Approved June 6, 1989

Amended:  December 6, 2016

 

Previous Policy Number: HF1.2

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HF1.2

Career and Vocational Education

6120.3

Career and Vocational Education 6120.3

It is the policy of the Meriden Board of Education that its public school system shall design and implement a developmental program of Career and Vocational Education. This program will include the career tasks in those areas in which the school system has the capabilities of providing employment skills, job preparation, job entry, job adjustment and progression. Further, this developmental program shall emphasize career awareness at all levels and career exploration at the middle and high school levels and job entry skills at the high school level.

In affirming its commitment to the concept of Career and Vocational Education, the B

oard recognizes that this concept not only complements regular curricula, but is interrelated with other subject matter areas. The implementation of this policy will result in the development of a broad sequence of learning experiences in Career and Vocational Education. The Board, realizing the need for support of this policy, encourages parents, students, schools staff, business, labor, industry, government and other public groups to promote its advancement.

Cross Reference:

Policy 6119 (Organization of Instruction)

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016

Previous Policy Number: HF1.3

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HF1.3

CURRICULAR EXEMPTIONS

6122

CURRICULAR EXEMPTIONS 6122

Mandatory Curricular Exemptions:

Upon the written request of a parent or guardian received by the school district prior to planned instruction in the areas set forth below, the Board shall permit curricular exemptions for instruction in the following areas:

  1. Dissection;
  2. Family life education;
  3. HIV/AIDS; and
  4. Sexual abuse and assault awareness and prevention program (effective upon the implementation of the sexual abuse and assault awareness and prevention program identified or developed by the state).

Definitions:

“Dissection Instruction” is defined as instruction in which a student must participate in, or observe, the dissection of any animal.

“Family Life Education Instruction” is defined as instruction pertaining to family planning, human sexuality, parenting, nutrition and the emotional, physical, psychological, hygienic, economic and social aspects of family life.  

“HIV/AIDS Instruction” is defined as ongoing and systematic instruction on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) offered by the district pursuant to state law.

“Sexual abuse and assault awareness and prevention program” is defined as the state-wide program identified or developed by the Department of Children and Families, in collaboration with the Department of Education and Connecticut Sexual Assault Crisis Services, Inc. (or a similar entity) that includes age-appropriate educational materials designed for children in grades kindergarten to twelve, inclusive, regarding child sexual abuse and assault awareness and prevention that may include, but not be limited to, (A) the skills to recognize (i) child sexual abuse and assault, (ii) boundary violations and unwanted forms of touching and contact, and (iii) ways offenders groom or desensitize victims, and (B) strategies to (i) promote disclosure, (ii) reduce self-blame, and (iii) mobilize bystanders.

Written Request for Mandatory Exemption:

Parents who wish to exercise such exemptions must notify the school district in writing within the first two weeks of school.

Permissive Curricular Exemptions:

Except for the mandatory curricular exemptions noted above, or otherwise required by law, the Board does not require teachers to exempt students from any other aspect of the curriculum.  

Alternative Assignments:

  1. Any student excused from participating in, or observing, the dissection of any animal as part of classroom instruction shall be required to complete an alternate assignment to be determined by the teacher.
  2.   Any student excused from participating in the sexual abuse and assault awareness and prevention program shall be provided, during the period of time in which the student would otherwise be participating in such program, an opportunity for other study or academic work as determined by the teacher.
  3.   Any student excused from any other aspect of the curriculum may be required by the teacher to complete an alternative assignment as determined by the teacher.

Legal References:

Connecticut General Statutes Sections. § 10-16c

Connecticut General Statutes Sections. § 10-16e  

Connecticut General Statutes Sections § 10-18d

Connecticut General Statutes Sections § 10-19(b)

Connecticut General Statutes Sections § 17a-101q, as amended by Special Session Public Act 15-5, § 415

Approved  November 17, 2015

Amended  December 6, 2016

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number:

Curricular Exemption Request Form

6122(E)

Click Link: Curricular Exemption Request Form

Approved 11/17/2015
Previous Policy Number:

INTERSCHOLASTIC PROGRAMS

6123

INTERSCHOLASTIC PROGRAMS 6123

It is the policy of the Board to provide high school students with interscholastic athletic competition in a variety of sports. Students shall be allowed to participate in individual sports on the basis of their athletic ability, physical condition, desire and academic standing. Qualified personnel shall be provided for coaching and supervising individual sports.

Interscholastic programs shall meet the following conditions:

Participation in interscholastic athletics is limited to high school students.

Those staff members having direct responsibility for the conduct of the athletic programs of the schools are required to conform in all ways to the policies established by the Board and the administration, including but not limited to such matters as schedules, financial expenditures, relationships with other schools, and health and safety regulations.

The Meriden Public Schools is a member of the Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference (CIAC) and in all athletic matters will adhere firmly to the rules and regulations of that body and to the philosophy of sports which CIAC encourages. The eligibility of students to participate in the athletic program is determined in accordance with CIAC regulations.

The district’s participation in interscholastic athletics shall be subject to approval by the Board.

Insurance against accident or injury shall be provided by the district for students engaging in interscholastic athletics.

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016

 

Previous Policy Number: HF3.6

 

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HF3.6

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

6124

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS                        6124

Student organizations shall generally be encouraged when they meet the criterion of contributing to the learning process.

All student organizations associated with the Meriden Public Schools shall comply with written school procedures.

All requirements for membership in student organizations must reasonably reflect the purposes of the organization. Membership shall not be subject to the popular vote of existing members of any such organization. Fraternities and sororities are prohibited in all Meriden schools.

School-planned and school-sponsored activities shall be designed so that students who might be otherwise qualified or interested will not be excluded because of the expense associated with those activities.

Public performances shall be limited to those from which a definite educational benefit is to be obtained. They may never be held for purposes that contribute to private gain or advantage.

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016

Previous Policy Number: HF3.1

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HF3.1

Intramural Programs

6124.1

Intramural Programs                            6124.1

The Board believes that athletic programs should provide benefits to as large a number of students as possible. It is, therefore, the policy of the Board to provide an intramural program as an outgrowth of class instruction in physical education and commensurate with the grade level of the students involved. The program should encourage participation by all, regardless of degree of skill, and should be carried on with the best interests of the participants as the first consideration. Qualified personnel shall supervise intramural sports.

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016


Previous Policy Number: HF3.5

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HF3.5

ALTERNATE SCHOOL PROGRAM

6128

ALTERNATE SCHOOL PROGRAM                    6128

The Board endorses the concept of alternate educational experiences for secondary students who believe, together with their parents, that alternate methods of education would be more beneficial to the students. Such programs may be on the basis of an abbreviated day in regular courses of study or a full-time day involving special courses of study.

Cross Reference:

Policy 5230 (Employment)

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016


Previous Policy Number: HF2.3

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HF2.3

Information About Alternate School Program

6128.1 (R)

ORIGIN OF PROGRAM

The Meriden Alternate School Program (ASP) began in 1977 for the purpose of meeting the needs of students who were actual or potential high school dropouts. It is a secondary (9-12) program offering a regular high school diploma from the students’ respective high schools. The ASP is totally funded by the Meriden Board of Education.

PURPOSE

The major goal of the Alternate School is to provide an education through individualized programs. Personal achievement in academic, social and vocational endeavors is the program objective.

SITE

The ASP is housed in a building separate from the traditional high school. Students earn credit through academic work pursued at the ASP facility and through activities carried on at work sites in the community.

PROGRAM COMPONENTS

All students in the ASP may elect one or a combination of the following components:

Small Group Instruction

Students must attend classes daily from 8:00 - 12:00.

Independent Study

These required or elective courses are usually taken in addition to the five courses taken in small group instruction. Weekly assignments are contractual and must be arranged between the student and individual teacher.

Work Study

Students must be employed a minimum of twenty hours per week. They are assigned a learning coordinator and all academic work is contractual. Work study students must meet with their learning coordinator one afternoon per week from 12:45 - 2:30.

Work Experience

Students electing this component are given an opportunity to explore and experience career options. Credit may be earned through career exploration and/or on-the-job training.

Individual and Group Counseling

Resources are provided for individual, group and family counseling. Counseling sessions are scheduled during the school day and in the evening.

STUDENT EVALUATION

The ASP is non-graded in its approach to instruction and offers the student narrative evaluations in lieu of grades. Course credit is awarded on a point system, 200 points being equal to one credit. All courses are based on specific learner objectives, and points are earned by completing units of instruction which have a predetermined point value. Twenty-one and a quarter (21.25) credits, including eleven Board of Education requirements in English, Math, Science and Social Studies, entitle the student to his/her high school diploma.

STUDENT SELECTION

Enrollment in the ASP is voluntary. Interested students must submit a written application and be interviewed by an ASP staff member. All applicants are screened and selected by the ASP staff.

PROGRAM STAFF

Current staffing at the ASP includes one teacher/director, two full-time learning coordinators, one full-time counselor/teacher, and a full-time secretary.

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HF2.3-R

Personalized Learning Experiences (PLEs)

6128.2

Personalized Learning Experiences (PLEs)                6128.2

The Board permits the establishment of personalized learning programs at the high school level to the extent that staffing allocations and program development will permit.

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016


Previous Policy Number: HG2

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HG2

SUMMER SCHOOL

6129

SUMMER SCHOOL                            6129

The Meriden Public School system shall sponsor a summer program providing students with learning opportunities.

Tuition fees for resident and non-resident students shall be charged, subject to Board approval, except as such programs are funded by the federal government or other outside agencies.

The summer school curriculum shall be established in accordance with the needs of students. The administration shall have the right to cancel announced summer courses for which there is insufficient enrollment and to refund fees. Credit-recovery courses at the high school level shall provide opportunities for students to obtain credit in subjects where previous work has not met established standards.

The Superintendent shall appoint a director to supervise the program.

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016


Previous Policy Number: HF2.2

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HF2.2

Summer School Regulations (General)

6129.1 (R)

The Summer School Program sponsored by the Meriden Public Schools is to be operated in accordance with the following procedures:

  1. The Summer School is in session annually for a five-week period beginning in early July and ending prior to the middle of August. High school makeup courses, driver education and recreational clinics are offered.
  2. Students in grades two-twelve are eligible for participation in the Summer School. This includes students just completing grade one who have been promoted to grade two for the following school year.
  3. The Summer School operates on a self-sufficient basis. Fees are assessed to students in order to meet the costs of operating the program. Fees for the Summer School Program will be approved by the Board of Education.
  4. Students who fail to comply with the normally accepted rules of conduct, explained on the first day of class, will be asked to withdraw. Fees in such cases will not be refunded.
  5. Courses listed in the Summer School brochure will be offered only if there is sufficient enrollment. This is a decision that will be made by the Summer School Director who will also oversee the hiring of staff and the assignment of students to classes.
  6. Students not enrolled in the Meriden Public Schools may participate in the Summer School Program.
Approved 4/8/1987
Previous Policy Number: HF2.2-R(1)

Summer School Regulations (Makeup Credit)

6129.2 (R)
  1. In order to be eligible for Summer School makeup credit, students must have passed at least two terms of the failed courses unless a waiver has been granted. A waiver is granted only upon the recommendation of the school principal and the approval of the Assistant Superintendent for Instruction.
  2. Students enrolled in courses for makeup credit are expected to be in class on a daily basis. Students who miss more than three classes will not be granted makeup credit for their work.
  3. For each term of work failed in courses required for graduation, students are required to participate in one Summer School makeup class. To be specific, if a student has failed only one term of such a course, then the student would have to make up that term’s work during one Summer School class session. If the student has failed two terms of the course, then the student would have to make up the assigned work over two Summer School classes.
  4. In the case of waivers, students would be required to make up the assigned work over two Summer School classes.
  5. Classroom teachers have the option of providing course prescriptions to Summer School teachers for makeup courses. Teachers electing this option must have the material available at the appropriate time prior to the beginning of Summer School.
  6. Students are required to pass final exams or unit tests in order to earn makeup credit. Teachers must have their exams or unit tests available at the appropriate time as determined by the Summer School Director.
  7. The Summer School Director may limit the number of academic levels available for makeup within a course or courses if circumstances warrant such a limit.
  8. Students earning makeup credit are given a passing grade of “P”. The makeup credit is noted on the transcript. No quality points are given for the work nor are makeup courses used in determining class rank.
Approved 4/8/1987
Previous Policy Number: HF2.2-R(2)

ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM

6130

ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM                6130

The Adult Education Program refers to those courses which are offered outside of the regular school day and are not an integral part of the elementary and secondary school programs. The general objectives of adult education shall be to prepare individuals for democratic citizenship and to provide them with means for personal improvement, enrichment, and cultural development.

Costs for instructors and materials shall be covered by registration fees, tuition, and book or material charges except for those courses mandated by and/or funded by the federal government or outside agencies.

Physical facilities of the school system shall be available for use in the Adult Education Program when they are not scheduled for regular school or other approved activities.

The Superintendent shall appoint an administrator to supervise the Adult Education Program.

Cross Reference:

Policy 6119 (Organization of Instruction)

 

Approved 4/28/1981

Amended December 6, 2016

 

Previous Policy Number: HF4

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HF4

CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT

6140

CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT                    6140

The Board deems it essential that the school system continually develop and modify its curriculum to meet the changing needs and diversity of its citizenry and to assure the full, rounded and continuing development of the individuals of the community. While the Board retains its full rights and responsibilities under the law with regard to the determination of the curriculum, it authorizes the administration to use a wide range of resources in the development of curriculum. Such resources may include professional staff; lay members of the community; experience of other systems; programs of schools, colleges and universities; and information prepared by schools of education, educational foundations, and state and federal governments.

The following guidelines have been established by the Board:

The curriculum shall contain all courses required by the State Department of Education.

The curriculum shall convey an education which emphasizes the knowledge and skills which are necessary to be college, career and civic ready.

Cross Reference:

Policy 6120 (Basic Instructional Programs)

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number:

Study Committees

6140.1

Study Committees                                6140.1

 

Teachers shall participate on committees to discuss and make recommendations on matters of educational development.

Cross Reference:

Policy 6161 (Selection and Adoption)

Policy 6160 (Textbook Selection and Adoption)

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HE1

The Curriculum Network

6140.11 (R)

Meriden’s Curriculum Network serves to oversee the ongoing refinement of the K-12 instructional program. The network is intended to meet the following objectives:

  1. To increase shared decision-making among staff with regard to curriculum development.
  2. To effectively use the expertise available among staff at all levels in curriculum development.
  3. To expand curricular activity in all K-12 instructional areas at all levels within the school system.

The Curriculum Network is structured in the following way:

  1. Permanent curriculum committees have been established for all K-12 instructional areas. The committees are organized on a K-12 basis with representation from all grade levels and all buildings.
  2. Co-chairpersons are selected to head each committee. One co-chairperson is a member of the administrative staff who has expressed an interest and/or has a background in the particular subject area while the other co-chairperson is a committee member elected from the teaching staff.* The co-chairpersons would lead the committees in all of their deliberations.
  3. One co-chairperson from each of the individual committees come together to serve as a cabinet to meet and plan with the Assistant Superintendent for Instruction on curricular and instructional issues. The cabinet defines overall curricular priorities and deliberates on other matters that would serve to structure the activities of individual committees. Either of the co-chairpersons may represent their committee in the cabinet. Co-chairpersons can alternate in this role or one could assume the role for a designated period of time.
  4. The functions of the individual committees and the cabinet are advisory in nature.

The Curriculum Network employs the following process for curriculum development:

  1. Each committee meets at least annually to review relevant issues.
  2. Curriculum committees engaged in active program review meet on a frequent basis throughout the year. Co-chairpersons are to keep the Assistant Superintendent for Instruction informed as to the activities of the committee.
  3. A yearly status report in each curricular area is submitted by the individual committees to the Assistant Superintendent for Instruction for review in the spring.
  4. Committees have been established in the following areas: Art, Business Education, Career Education, Computer Education, English/Language Arts, Foreign Language, Health, Home Economics, Industrial Arts, Learning Resources, Math, Music, Physical Education, Reading, Science and Social Studies.

*Subject supervisors are, of course, the administrative co-chairpersons in those areas where they are available.

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HE1-R(1)

Procedures for the Organization and Implementation of School Curriculum Improvement Committees (K-5)

6140.12 (R)

It is most essential to formalize the process for guiding responsive curricular change within the elementary schools. Each school must have an internal mechanism for initiating, coordinating, analyzing and recommending improvements in curricular programming that brings to staff a voice in decision-making.

FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMITTEE

  1. 1. To serve as a clearinghouse for all suggested curricular related matter submitted by school staff members.
  2. To plan for the orderly implementation of such improvements as adopted by the committee.
  3. To recommend in-service programs or activities that would parallel suggested curricular changes endorsed by the committee.
  4. To consider and take action with regard to curriculum related concerns as they occur throughout the school year.

COMMITTEE PERSONNEL

The School Curriculum Improvement Committee should consist of the building principal, two primary level teachers, and two intermediate level teachers. Other staff personnel and special teachers may participate in committee sessions as deemed appropriate. Also, the School Curriculum Improvement Committee should call upon supervisory personnel and curriculum co-chairpersons for purposes of communication, coordination and support.

COMMITTEE PROCEDURES

  1. The committee should meet on at least a monthly basis for approximately one hour.
  2. An agenda should be published in advance of the meeting. Any staff member can submit agenda items.
  3. Minutes should be kept at each meeting and published (or posted) for the benefit of staff, curriculum committee co-chairpersons, and the Assistant Superintendent for Instruction.
  4. Specifically, the committee should consider any matter related to programming including at least the following components: instructional materials, grouping procedures, evaluative procedures, organizational matters, teaching strategies, professional development and staff allocation.
  5. All committee recommendations dealing with short-term matters should be implemented at the building level as soon as feasible. All committee recommendations having implications for significant program change are to be reviewed with the Assistant Superintendent for Instruction prior to implementation.

FUNDING ASSISTANCE

The SCIC must, of course, have access to financial resources if it is ever to truly function in a meaningful way. Through PPBES, each school is allocated amounts of money, by program, through which to assist in funding recommendations approved by the SCIC.

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HE1-R(2)

Instructional Decision-Making Roles (K-12)

6140.2 (R)

View / download INSTRUCTIONAL DECISION-MAKING ROLES (K-12) (printable PDF)

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HE-R(1)

Curriculum Guides and Course Outlines

6140.3

Curriculum Guides and Course Outlines                    6140.3

Curriculum guides shall be provided electronically to all teachers. These guides shall present at least a minimal outline for instruction and a basis for further development of the particular course.

The Board assigns to the Superintendent the responsibility for the development and implementation of such curriculum guides as well as the responsibility for monitoring their use.

Curriculum guides will be revised and updated according to student needs and as a result of program evaluation.

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016

 

Previous Policy Number: HE3

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HE3

CURRICULUM ADOPTION AND REVISION

6141

CURRICULUM ADOPTION AND REVISION 6141

It is the policy of the Board that no basic course of study shall be eliminated or new courses added without approval of the Board, nor shall any major alteration or reduction of a course of study be made without such approval.

A proposed program initiative or proposed curricular change of an unusual nature or broad scope shall not be acted upon by the Board until the meeting following its presentation by the administration. This allows Board members an opportunity to review the proposed program in depth prior to decision-making. All such program proposals shall include a design for the quantitative evaluation of the program.

In order to ensure responsible educational change, programs may be introduced as pilot projects when appropriate, subject to the Board’s approval in accordance with the foregoing paragraph.

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended August 16, 2011

Approved August 16, 2011

Amended December 6, 2016

 

Previous Policy Number: HF2

 

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HF2

Proposal for New Course, Pilot Course or New Program

6141.11 (E)

Please click on link for the following forms:

Page 1 and 2 - Proposal for new course, pilot course or new program

Page 3 - Proposal for new course, pilot course or new program - principal/department leader signature sheet

Page 4 - Proposal for new course, pilot course or new program - curriculum, director and chairperson signature sheet

 

 

/uploads/Pilot_Course_Forms_Curriculum_Forms_2019__4_of_4_.pdf

Approved 11/19/2019
Previous Policy Number: HE2-E

Pilot Programs

6141.12 (R)

Pilot Programs 6141.12 (R)

Pilot programs shall be reviewed by the appropriate Curriculum Committee, Curriculum Administrator, and by the Assistant Superintendent and recommended for Board approval when appropriate.

Prior to the district-wide implementation of a pilot program, the staff  proposing its adoption will submit an evaluation of the program to the Assistant Superintendent. District-wide implementation of an existing major pilot program shall not take place until there is sufficient evidence to justify its incorporation into the educational programming or curriculum.

New teaching methods which do not significantly depart from existing methods, minor improvements in the pilot programs such as those involving instructional material, and improvements of limited applicability do not require prior Board approval. However, the Board members are to be informed of such changes prior to full implementation if they are to be adopted on a district-wide basis.

Approved:  April 28, 1981

Amended:  August 16, 2011

Amended: December 6, 2016

 

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HE2-R(1)

Process for the Development of the High School Program of Studies

6141.13 (R)

View / download PROCESS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM OF STUDIES (printable PDF)

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HE2-R(2)

Procedures for the Development of Detailed Curricula for High School Courses

6141.14 (R)

Procedures for the Development of Detailed Curricula for High School Courses 6141.14(R)

  1. Detailed curricula are to be developed for all high school courses on an annual basis.
  2. Existing detailed course curricula in need of revision are to be updated annually during the school year and submitted for production over the summer.
  3. Detailed course curricula for new courses that were approved by the Board of Education during the preceding school year are to be submitted during the spring of the first full year of implementation. For their first year of implementation new offerings will function on a pilot basis utilizing the learner objectives for the courses.

 

Approved January 23, 1985

Approved December 6, 2016

Previous Policy Number: HE2-R(3)



Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HE2-R(3)

BILINGUAL PROGRAM

6141.3

BILINGUAL PROGRAM 6141.3

The Meriden Board of Education is committed to the concept that all students will have equal access to learning based on each student’s dominant language. When this language is not English, a suitable program will be provided that is appropriate for each student.

In the Meriden Public Schools, English and Spanish are the most common dominant student languages. A K-12 Bilingual Education Program (BEP) is provided for Spanish-dominant students. These students are taught in Spanish and English until they are proficient in English and then they are placed in a regular classroom. When the Bilingual Education Program is not appropriate for Spanish-dominant students or other students whose dominant language is not English, English as a Second Language is offered to assist these students to develop English language proficiency.

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016

 

Previous Policy Number: HF2.4

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HF2.4

Bilingual Program Home Language Survey

6141.31 (E)

View / download BILINGUAL PROGRAM HOME LANGUAGE SURVEY (printable PDF)

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HF2.4-E(1)

Bilingual Program Observation Form

6141.32 (E)

View / download BILINGUAL PROGRAM OBSERVATION FORM (printable PDF)

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HF2.4-E(2)

Electronic Network Use

6141.3211 (R)

View/ download ELECTRONIC NETWORK USE guidelines (printable PDF) »

 

Approved 10/9/2001
Amended 3/23/2004 

Approved 3/23/2004
Previous Policy Number: HH1.3R

Internet Acceptable Use: Filtering

6141.323

Access to Electronic Networks:

Electronic networks, including the Internet, are a part of the district’s instructional program in order to promote educational excellence by facilitating resource sharing, innovation and communication. In this policy and regulations hereunder, the computers, computer network, electronic devices, Internet access, and email system installed and provided by the Board are referred to collectively as the “electronic networks.”  

The Superintendent or his/her designee shall develop an administrative regulation containing an implementation plan for this policy. The implementation plan shall include, at a minimum, provisions for integration of the Internet in the curriculum, staff training, software filters and safety issues.

The district is not responsible for any information that may be lost, damaged or unavailable when using the network or for any information that is retrieved or transmitted via the Internet. In addition, the district will not be responsible for any unauthorized charges or fees resulting from access to the Internet.

Acceptable Use, Privacy, and Monitoring:

The electronic network and computer systems are educational and business tools.  All use of the district’s electronic network must be:

  1. in support of education and/or research and be in furtherance of the Board of Education’s goals, or
  2. for a legitimate school business purpose.

Use of the district’s electronic networks is a privilege, not a right.  The Board of Education reserves the right to monitor the use of the electronic networks to ensure they are being used in accordance with these regulations. Users should have no expectation of privacy in the use of the electronic network or other electronic devices that access the electronic network.  Use of the computer system represents an employee’s acknowledgment that the employee has read and understands this policy and the applicable regulations in their entirety, including provisions regarding monitoring and review of computer activity. General rules for behavior and communications apply when using electronic networks as contained in Board Administrative Policy, “Electronic Network Use” Electronic communications and downloaded material, including files deleted from a user’s account but not erased, may be monitored or read by school officials.

Notwithstanding the above and in accordance with state law, the Board may not: (1) request or require that an employee provide the Board with a user name and password, password, or any other authentication means for accessing a personal online account; (2) request or require that an employee authenticate or access a personal online account in the presence of the Board; or (3) require that an employee invite a supervisor employed by the Board or accept an invitation from a supervisor employed by the Board to join a group affiliated with any personal online account of the employee.  However, the Board may request or require that an employee provide the Board with a user name and password, password, or any other authentication means for accessing (1) any account or service provided by the Board or by virtue of the employee’s employment relationship with the Baord or that the employee uses for the Board’s business purposes, or (2) any electronic communications device supplied or paid for, in whole or in part, by the Board.

In accordance with applicable law, the Board maintains the right to require an employee to allow the Board to access his or her personal online account, without disclosing the user name and password, password, or other authentication means for accessing such personal online account, for the purpose of:

  1. Conducting an investigation for the purpose of ensuring compliance with applicable state or federal laws, regulatory requirements or prohibitions against work-related employee misconduct based on the receipt of specific information about activity on an employee’s personal online account; or
  2. Conducting an investigation based on the receipt of specific information about an employee’s unauthorized transfer of the Board’s proprietary information, confidential information, or financial data to or from a personal online account operated by an employee or other source.

For purposes of this policy, “personal online account” means any online account that is used by an employee exclusively for personal purposes and unrelated to any business purpose of the Board, including but not limited to electronic mail and retail-based Internet web sites.  “Personal online account” does not include any account created, used, or accessed by an employee for purposes of the Board.

Curriculum:

The use of the District’s electronic networks shall:

  1. be consistent with the curriculum adopted by the Board of Education as well as the varied instructional needs, learning styles, abilities and developmental levels of the students, and
  2. comply with the selection criteria for instructional materials and library media center materials.

Staff members may, consistent with the Superintendent’s regulations and implementation plan, utilize the electronic networks throughout the curriculum for educational and legitimate school business purposes.

The district’s electronic network is integral to the curriculum and is not a public forum for general use.

Internet Safety:

Each district computer with Internet access shall have a filtering device that blocks access to visual depictions that are obscene, pornographic or harmful or inappropriate for students, as defined by the Children’s Internet Protection Act and as determined by the Superintendent or his/her designee. The Superintendent or his/her designee shall enforce the use of such filtering devices. A principal or other authorized person may disable the filtering device for bona fide research or other lawful purpose, provided the person receives prior permission from the Superintendent or his/her designee.

District personnel shall educate minors about appropriate online behavior, including interacting with other individuals on social networking websites and in chat rooms, as well as cyber-bullying awareness and response, in conjunction with the Protecting Children in the 21st Century Act.

The Superintendent or his/her designee shall include measures in this policy’s implementation plan and administrative regulation to address the following:

  1. Restricting student access to inappropriate matter as well as restricting access to harmful materials;
  2. Student safety and security when using electronic communications;
  3. Limiting unauthorized access, including “hacking” and other unlawful activities; and
  4. Limiting unauthorized disclosure, use and dissemination of personal identification information.

Authorization for Electronic Network Access:

Each student and his/her parent or guardian must sign the District’s authorization form prior to being granted unsupervised use of the network.

All users of the District’s electronic networks shall maintain the confidentiality of student records in accordance with state and federal law. Reasonable measures to protect against unreasonable access shall be taken before confidential student information is placed onto the electronic networks.

The failure of any student or staff member to follow the terms of the authorization form, this policy or its accompanying administrative regulations will result in the loss of privileges, disciplinary action, and/or appropriate legal action.

Legal References:

Connecticut General Statutes:

1-210(b)(17) Access to public records. Exempt records.

10-15b Access of parent or guardians to student’s records.

10-209 Records not to be public.

31-40x Employer inquiries re employee’s or prospective employee’s personal online accounts.  Exceptions. Enforcement.

Federal law:

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, codified at 20 U.S.C. §§ 1232g et. seq.

34 C.F.R. 99.1-99.67

Children’s Internet Protection Act, Pub. L. No. 106-554, codified as amended at 20 U.S.C. § 7131

The Copyright Act of 1976, codified at17 U.S.C. 101 et. seq.

20 U.S.C. § 6318, as amended by Every Student Succeeds Act, Pub. L. No. 114-95 (2015)

FCC Order 03-188, July 23 2003

Cross Reference:

Policy 4034 (Employee Use of the District's Computer Systems and Electronic Communications

Policy 5500 (Student Use of the District's Computer Systems and Internet Safety)

Approved October 9, 2001

Amended March 23, 2004

Amended January 6, 2009

Amended December 6, 2016

Amended November 21, 2017

 

Previous Policy Number: HH1.3

 

Approved 11/21/2017
Previous Policy Number: HH1.3

Classroom Language Dominance Survey

6141.33 (E)

View / download CLASSROOM LANGUAGE DOMINANCE SURVEY (printable PDF)

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HF2.4-E(3)

Annual Review

6141.34 (E)

View / download ANNUAL REVIEW (printable PDF)

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HF2.4-E(5)

Bilingual Office Letter to Parent

6141.35 (E)

View / download BILINGUAL OFFICE LETTER TO PARENT (printable PDF)

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HF2.4-E(6)

Bilingual Program

6141.36 (R)

Bilingual Program 6141.36 (R)

PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF DOMINANT LANGUAGE

In order to determine the student’s home language, parent(s) or guardian will complete the system-wide registration material. As this time, the Home Language Survey form is completed for all students entering the Meriden Public Schools for the first time.

If the students and parent(s) speak no English and translators are not available, the following procedures are to be used:

  1. Notify, as soon as possible, the Supervisor of Bilingual and ESOL Programs.
  2. The Central Registration office will provide, as quickly as possible, interpreters to assist the student, his/her parent, and school personnel.
  3. In addition to the student’s name, address, telephone number, and name(s) of relatives, medical records and academic records are to be obtained by the school which the student will attend. Translation services, if available, will be provided at the school’s request.
  4. Testing to determine the student’s dominant language and English language proficiency will be completed by the Bilingual Office.

. 5. Students who require English as a Second Language instruction (E.S.L.) will be serviced at their resident schools by E.S.L. personnel to be assigned by the Supervisor of Bilingual and ESOL Programs. The extent of E.S.L. is to be determined individually for each student.

  1. Only Spanish dominant students are to be transferred out of district to a school that has an appropriate bilingual grade level; this is the practice established in the bilingual segment of our OCR Plan.
  2. The Grants Administration Office will identify non-English language translation resources when school personnel are not equipped to effectively translate.

FINAL DETERMINATION OF DOMINANT LANGUAGE

The final determination of a student’s dominant language will be obtained by the administration of equivalent tests in the language ascertained in the preliminary assessment of dominant language and in English. The Bilingual Syntax Measure will be administered to students in kindergarten and first grade. The Crane Dominance Test will be administered to students in grades 2-12. This testing will be completed within five school days.

When a formal observation is utilized, the student is to be observed in unstructured situations with his or her peers by a teacher or trained person proficient in the presumed dominant language and in English (Form HF2.4-E-2). In addition, a Classroom Language Dominance Survey form is to be filled out by the classroom teacher (Form HF2.4-E-3).

DETERMINATION OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

The determination of the student’s English language proficiency will be completed when all of the following are administered:

  1. A standardized English language proficiency test (Language Assessment Battery, L.A.B.);
  2. Academic grades or other periodic indicators of achievement received by each student in classes taught in English, if available;
  3. A personal interview with the student conducted in English by a person trained to conduct such an interview.

PLACEMENT IN BILINGUAL EDUCATION

After the student has been determined to be limited English proficient by the procedures previously described, placement in the bilingual education program (B.E.P.) will occur within twenty school days.

Before a student is placed in the B.E.P., the parent(s)/guardian(s) will be informed about the program, the student’s dominant language classification and the placement of the student in a required program of education. The parent(s)/guardian(s) are then asked, in writing, whether they wish to have the student placed in the B.E.P. English as a Second Language program services will be available for those students who qualify for the B.E.P. but whose parents do not wish placement in that program.

DETERMINATION OF GENERAL ABILITIES

 

Students identified for the B.E.P. and placed in the program will be assessed for their level of achievement in the areas of vocabulary, reading and mathematics in their dominant language. The classroom teacher will administer the Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills in Spanish to determine the student’s level of achievement.

BILINGUAL EDUCATION PROGRAM

The Bilingual Education Program is located in the following schools:

K-1 Thomas Hooker Elementary School

2-5 Hanover Elementary School

6-8 Lincoln Middle School

9-12 Maloney High School

Transportation for students in the B.E.P. will be determined on the same basis as students residing in that district.

Procedures for transportation requests should be made as follows:

  1. The home district school principal initiates the request.
  2. The principal sends the transportation request to the Transportation, Safety and Compliance Officer.
  3. The principal or the Supervisor of Bilingual and ESOL Programs will inform the parent of the student’s assigned bus stop.
  4. If there are extra or special transportation costs, the Transportation, Safety and Compliance Officer will confer with the Grants Administrator to determine a final course of action.

EXITING THE BILINGUAL PROGRAM

The English proficiency of each student placed in a bilingual education program shall be reviewed annually.

When the annual review process verifies that the student may have become sufficiently proficient in English to be assessed, all of the following indicators are to be considered in analyzing the student’s progress for purposes of exiting the program:

  1. Scores at or above the 50th percentile on the English Language Assessment Battery Test;

2-a. Academic grades or other periodic indicators of achievement in classes taught in English while in the program which are at least average;

2-b. A cumulative average at or above the 35th percentile on the Iowa Test of Basic Skills in Reading, Language Arts and Mathematics; and

  1. A rating in group 2 in the English interview process.

The student shall not remain in the B.E.P. when two of three criteria above are met (Form HF2.4-E-6).

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE PROGRAM (E.S.L.)

Students whose parents do not select the B.E.P. or students for whom bilingual education is inappropriate will be provided with English as a Second Language program services. With the English as a Second Language Program available in all schools, all children in the community who are dominant in another language are assured of the opportunity to learn to speak, read and write in English.

REVIEW AND HEARING

A parent, guardian, a child’s attorney or other person responsible for a child may request a review and/or a hearing to challenge any or all of the following:

  1. The determination that the child is dominant in a language other than English;
  2. The identification of the dominant language;
  3. The placement of the child in the bilingual education program designated by the Board of Education;
  4. The determination that the child is proficient in English;
  5. The removal of the child from the bilingual education program; and
  6. The failure of the Board of Education to evaluate the child and the failure of the Board of Education to classify the child as dominant in a language other than English.

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended December 6, 2016

Previous Policy Number: HF2.4-R










Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HF2.4-R

WELLNESS POLICY

6142.101

WELLNESS POLICY 6142.101

 

It is the policy of the Meriden Board of Education to promote the health and well-being of district students by supporting wellness, good nutrition and regular physical activity as part of the total learning environment.  In furtherance of this policy, the Board has created an Advisory Council on Wellness (“Advisory Council”) to review any available state or federal guidance on wellness issues and to assist in formulating recommendations for specific goals and guidelines aimed at promoting lifelong wellness practices among district students.  This Advisory Council involves parents, students, representatives from the school food authority (i.e., any private company employed to provide food services), teachers of physical education, school health professionals, school administrators, the board of education, and members of the public and may also involve Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (“SNAP”) coordinators or educators.  The Advisory Council will be involved in the development and implementation of the policy, the triennial assessment and periodic updating of the policy.

 

  1. GOALS AND GUIDELINES

 

The Board recognizes that schools contribute to the health of children by facilitating learning through the support and promotion of good nutrition and physical activity, which helps to optimize student performance and ensure that every student succeeds.  Accordingly, the Board supports a healthy environment where children learn and participate in positive dietary and lifestyle practices.  Indeed, the Board believes that educators, administrators, parents, health practitioners and member of the school community should consider the critical role student health plays in academic stamina and performance and adapt the school environment to ensure students’ nutritional and physical activity needs are met.  To that end, the Board, following consultation with the Advisory Council, adopts the following goals and guidelines in order to promote student wellness:

 

  1. Provide a comprehensive learning environment for developing and practicing life-long wellness behaviors.

 

To achieve this end, the school environment, not just the classroom, shall provide clear and consistent messaging that reinforces and positively influences a student’s understanding, beliefs and habits as they relate to good nutrition and regular physical activity.  Nutrition education shall be integrated within the health education program and across other content areas such as science, language arts, family and consumer science, and cooking, where feasible.  Nutrition education shall be supported and supplemented whenever possible by the school health and school-based health center programs.  Further, nutrition education shall be standards-based using the Connecticut State Department of Education’s Healthy and Balanced Living Curriculum Framework at all grade levels and consistent with the State of Connecticut’s health education standards/guidelines/framework and the Connecticut State Department of Education’s Guidelines for a Coordinated Approach to School Health.  Nutrition education shall also be based on current science, research and national guidelines, including the use of U.S. Department of Agriculture Team Nutrition materials, MyPlate, and the most current dietary guidelines.  Educational materials shall be free of brands and illustrations of unhealthful foods.

 

Nutrition education shall be designed to help students learn: nutritional knowledge, including but not limited to, the benefits of healthy eating, essential nutrients, nutritional deficiencies, principles of healthy weight management, the use and misuse of dietary supplements, and safe food preparation, handling and storage; nutrition-related skills, including but not limited to, planning a healthy meal, understanding and using food labels, and critically evaluating nutritional information, misinformation, and commercial food advertising; and self-evaluation skills, including, but not limited to, assessing one’s personal eating habits; setting goals for improving eating habits and achieving such goals.

 

Cafeterias shall serve as an additional source of nutrition education, using posters and signage free of brands and illustrations of unhealthful foods, to promote good nutrition and food choices.  Faculty and staff are encouraged to serve as role models for students by demonstrating that healthy eating and physical activity are a valuable part of daily life.  



  1. Work collaboratively to support and promote proper dietary habits contributing to students’ wellness; academic performance and demonstrating a commitment to improving student nutrition.

 

The Board recognizes that healthy eating patterns are essential for students to achieve their academic potential, full physical and mental growth and life-long health and well-being. The link between nutrition and learning is well-documented.  Further, healthy eating is demonstrably linked to reduced risk for mortality and development of many chronic diseases as adults.  The Meriden Public Schools (the “District”) shall encourage students and staff members to establish and maintain life-long, healthy eating patterns.  Well-planned and well-implemented school nutrition programs have been shown to positively influence students’ eating habits.  To that end, school breakfast and lunch programs compliant with all federal and state laws and regulations shall be available at all schools.  In accordance with state law, a minimum of twenty minutes shall be allowed for lunch.   In addition, students shall be provided with a clean, pleasant, and safe environment for eating meals, which will include convenient access to hand-washing facilities and free, safe and fresh drinking water.  

 

Further, the District strongly discourages the use of food items as part of a student incentive program. Non-food alternatives are strongly encouraged for classroom celebrations.  Should a classroom celebration use food items, adherence to the guidance from the Connecticut Nutrition Standards is strongly encouraged.  Additionally, the use of healthy snacks such as those following the Connecticut Nutrition Standards limiting portion size, total fat, saturated fat, and grams of added sugar shall be strongly encouraged.  

 

Wherever possible, nutritional information shall be made available to faculty and staff members through a variety of means such as in-service training, publications, curriculum and publications which will include, but not be limited to, alternative birthday celebrations, activities to increase physical activity in the classroom, healthy snacks, alternative non-food reward options, and alternatives to withholding recess as a consequence for student actions.  Parents shall be encouraged to supply their child(ren) with naturally nutrient-rich foods and beverages such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, lean meats, legumes, nuts and seeds.  Soda brought from home is strongly discouraged.  

 

Lastly, the District supports and shall promote the opportunity for students to participate in Meriden’s Summer Food Service program, where they may receive two nutritionally balanced meals per day during the summer recess.  Information related to the program may be disseminated by the school website, newspapers, nurse newsletters, publications, open houses, speakers through the PTO, and health fairs.



  1. Provide opportunities for students to engage in physical activity.

 

The District takes a holistic approach towards increasing the health of students by concentrating on the physical, mental and emotional health of each student.  In furtherance of this goal, a quality physical education program is an essential component for all students to learn about and participate in physical activity.  The physical activity goal of the District is to keep the students in all grade levels physically active in order to help increase their overall level of health and well-being.  As a result, physical activities shall be provided to all students throughout the school day and integrated across the curricula when possible.

 

  1. Physical Education

 

The District’s Physical Education curriculum shall be based on the Healthy and Balanced Living Curriculum Framework and shall develop the psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domain of all students Pre-kindergarten to grade 12, inclusive.  Students will develop their psychomotor domain through instruction and practice of the skills necessary to be competent in a variety of physical activities.  Psychomotor assessments will be completed during each unit to measure competency of students.  The cognitive domain of the students will be developed through problem solving activities and self, as well as peer, assessment of skills. In high school, students shall be given written assessments to ensure understanding of skills and knowledge.  In order to develop their affective domain, students will be encouraged by their teachers and classmates to succeed and to view physical activity as being pleasurable. Teachers may assess the accomplishment of this domain through observation and classroom discussions.  Teachers shall be offered in-service training in order to increase their knowledge in the area of physical education.  

 

Generally, class size will be structured to ensure appropriate instruction and feedback opportunities.  Lessons shall be designed to provide appropriate scope and sequence for all activities, and modifications shall be made in order to include all students.  Rules to physical activities may be modified in order to prevent injuries based on class size, ability of students, or condition of a facility.  Students shall be encouraged to assist one another in order to create an emotionally safe environment.  Physical education instruction and activity shall be integrated into the school day as follows:

 

  • Elementary schools: students in PreK through grade 5 shall be given a minimum of 20 minutes per day to be physically active during recess; and shall participate in up to 30 minutes of structured physical education per week.
  • Middle schools:  students shall participate in up to 94 minutes of structured physical education per week for two terms during the year.  

 

  • High schools:  students in grades 9 through 11 shall participate in with up to 235 minutes of instruction for a half year.  The high school physical education curriculum shall allow students to choose the activities they participate in, with a focus on fitness and lifetime activities.  During fitness activities, students shall engage for the majority of the class in vigorous physical activity.  

 

Additionally, students in grades 4, 6, 8, and 10 shall participate in the Connecticut State Fitness Test in order to measure their level of fitness in the areas of flexibility, cardiovascular endurance, and muscular strength and endurance. The final exam for high school students in grades 9, 10, and 11 shall include the Connecticut State Fitness Test and a written assessment.  

 

  1. Other Opportunities For Physical Education

 

  1. Recess

 

Recess provides opportunities for physical activity, which helps students stay alert and attentive in class and provides other educational and social benefits.  School authorities shall encourage and develop schedules that provide a minimum of twenty (20) minutes within every school day for full-day elementary students to enjoy supervised recess.  The schools shall have playgrounds or other facilities and equipment available for free play.  Recess shall complement, not substitute for, physical education classes.  Staff members shall neither deny nor require a student’s participation in recess or other physical activity as a form of discipline or punishment, nor should they cancel it for instructional make-up time.



  1. Extracurricular Activities

 

Students are encouraged to participate in physical activities outside of school and are made aware, through instruction or assignments, as to where and when they can get involved in these activities. Extracurricular activities for the students in elementary school may include before- and after-school programs.  The middle schools may offer intramural sports and an outreach program after school. The high schools may offer intramural sports, including tennis, badminton, volleyball, and fitness activities such as weights and outdoor activities throughout the year.



iii. School/Community Collaboration

 

The District shall work with the Meriden Recreation Department and other community organizations to coordinate and enhance opportunities available to students and staff members for physical activity during their out-of-school time.  Students and staff are encouraged to participate in physical activities outside of school and are made aware through instruction or assignments as to where and when they can get involved in these activities.  Extracurricular activities for the students in elementary school may include before and after school programs.  The middle schools may offer intramural sports and an outreach program after school.  The high schools may offer intramural sports, such as tennis, badminton, volleyball, and fitness activities such as weights and outdoor activities, throughout the year. Intramural and intramural activities may not be substituted for physical education.

 

  1. Encourage and promote increased consumption of nutrient-dense foods and   beverages.

 

The Board believes that the District’s nutrition and food services operation is an essential educational support activity.  In accordance with federal law, the District’s National School Lunch Program (“NSLP”) and the School Breakfast Program (“SBP”) shall be nonprofit, and aim to be financially self-sufficient.  The District’s Special Milk Program and After School Snack Program shall comply with all the requirements for program operation.  Further, all reimbursable school meals (i.e., free and reduced lunches) shall meet the program requirements and nutrition standards established by U.S. Department of Agriculture; NSLP; SBP and all applicable state statutes and regulations applicable to school meals.  Feedback from food service staff and consumers (i.e., students, district staff and parents) shall be considered in the planning of appealing, varied, nutritious, high-quality meals that encourages increased participation in the reimbursable breakfast and lunch programs offered and discourages the purchase of á la carte and vended foods.

 

All non-reimbursable food items and beverages (i.e., á la carte sales) sold on school premises must meet the Connecticut Nutrition Standards and/or all applicable state statutes and regulations.  This requirement applies to the sale of food and beverages at all activities on school grounds, whether sponsored by the school or an outside group.  Food items that do not meet Connecticut Nutrition Standards and/or beverages that do not meet the requirements of applicable state statute may only be sold to students at the location of an event that occurs after the school day or on the weekend, provided the sale is not from a vending machine or a school store.  However, the Board believes healthy school environment shall not be sacrificed because of a dependence on revenue from high-added fat, high-added sugar and low-nutrient foods to support school programs.  Accordingly, the sale of non-food items is strongly encouraged to be used for fundraising projects.  Where food items are sold for such projects, nutrient-rich food items is encouraged.  Further, all fundraising projects involving the sale of food to students on school premises must follow the Connecticut Nutrition Standards and beverage requirements of the state statute at all times, unless they are sold to students at the location of an event that occurs after the school day or on the weekends, provided the sale is not from a vending machine or a school store.  Similarly, organizations operating concessions at events that occur after the school day or on the weekends shall offer water, and a minimum of, but not limited to, one fruit and/or vegetable option for purchase.  It is recommended that these healthier choices be marketed and sold at a lower profit margin to encourage student selection. The display and advertising of foods with minimal nutritional value is strongly discouraged.  

 

Foods items and beverages shall be served with consideration toward variety, appeal, taste, safety and packaging with an emphasis on nutrient-rich items such as fresh fruits; vegetables; whole grains; low fat dairy (i.e., 1% low-fat milk or less); lean meats; legumes; and nuts and seeds, while limiting levels of cholesterol, fat, saturated fat, trans fat, sodium and added sugars.   Food or beverage marketing on campus during school hours shall only be permitted of foods and beverages that may be sold on the school campus during the school day and that comply with the Connecticut Nutrition Standards and all applicable state laws and regulations.  

 

  1. Promote professional growth and development of food service management and cafeteria staff.

 

The Board shall encourage food service management and cafeteria staff to actively participate in nutrition professional organizations and partake in activities, based upon current nutrition science and national health recommendations, which promote professional growth and development.  The District’s food service manager and cafeteria managers shall, at minimum, be certified in food safety and sanitation.  In addition, all cafeteria staff shall be formally trained in Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (“HACCP”), food safety and sanitation requirements, and preparation of a variety of nutritious foods.  Further, all foods served shall meet or exceed the minimum nutrition standards set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for NSLP and SBP as well as applicable state statutes.  Foods purchased and/or prepared by food service management shall promote good health and nutrition by utilizing low-fat methods allowing for maximum nutrient retention, such as baking and steaming.

 

Food services personnel shall also provide families with the ability to monitor their children’s food purchases at all grade levels.  Nutrition information for school breakfast and lunch menu items shall be available upon request of the Food Service Program.  Nutrition information for á la carte, vended items, and items sold by the school stores, all meeting the Connecticut Nutrition Standards, shall be accessible on the Food Service Program’s website, if possible.  Wherever possible, other nutritional information shall be provided to parents on healthy snacks; breakfast and lunch ideas; non-food birthday celebration ideas; nutritional needs of children; healthy portion sizes; food label reading guidelines; and fun activities to encourage physical activity outside of school.  



  1. MEASURING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF WELLNESS POLICY
  2. Oversight of the Wellness Policy

Pursuant to this policy, the Board shall designate the Superintendent or designee to be responsible for the implementation and oversight of the school district’s wellness program.  The Superintendent or designee will be responsible for ensuring that the goals and guidelines relating to nutrition promotion and education, physical activity, school-based wellness activities and nutritional value of school-provided food and beverages are met, that there is compliance with the wellness policy, and that all school policies and school-based activities are consistent with the wellness policy.  

  1. Triennial Assessment

At least every three years, the Board will measure and make available to the public an assessment on the implementation of the wellness policy.  In this triennial assessment, the Board will indicate the extent to which schools are in compliance with the wellness policy and how the Board’s wellness policy compares with model school wellness policies.  In addition, the triennial assessment will provide a description of the progress made in attaining the goals of the wellness policy and will provide the basis for appropriate updates or modification to the wellness policy.  

  1. Informing and Updating the Public

In accordance with federal law and applicable regulations, the Board will inform and update the public (including parents, students and others in the community) about the content and implementation of its wellness policy as well as the results of the triennial assessment.  The results of the triennial assessment will be made available in an accessible and easily understood manner.  The Board will make its wellness policy and any updates to the policy available to the public on an annual basis.

  1. Recordkeeping

The Board of Education will retain records to document compliance with the local school wellness policy requirements.  The Board shall retain the Wellness Policy, documentation demonstrating compliance with community involvement requirements, documentation of the triennial assessment and documentation to demonstrate compliance with public notification requirements.

 

Legal References:

Connecticut General Statutes:

  • 10-215f     Certification that food meets nutrition standards.

 

  • 10-221o    Lunch periods. Recess.

 

  • 10-221p    Boards to make available for purchase nutritious and low-fat foods.

 

  • 10-221q    Sale of beverages.

 

Public Act 16-37, An Act Concerning Connecticut’s Farm to School Program

 

Public Act 16-132, An Act Establishing a Red Ribbon Pass Program

 

Federal Law:

42 U.S.C. § 1751

Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act § 9(f)(1) and § 17(a), codified at 42 U.S.C. § 1758(f)(1), 42 U.S.C. § 1758b and 42 U.S.C. § 1766, as amended by Pub. L. 111-296, § 204, Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010.

20 U.S.C. § 7118, as amended by Pub. L. 114-95, Every Student Succeeds Act.

 

7 C.F.R. § 210.10 Meal requirements for lunches and requirements for afterschool snacks.

 

7 C.F.R. § 210.11 Competitive food service and standards.

 

7 C.F.R. § 210.31. Local school wellness policy.

 

7 C.F.R. § 220.8 Meal requirements for breakfasts.

 

Approved June 20, 2006

Amended August 17, 2010

Amended April 28, 2015

Amended December 6, 2016

Amended November 21, 2017

Previous Policy Number: HF1.4

 

 

 

Approved 11/21/2017
Previous Policy Number: HF1.4

GUIDELINES FOR TEACHING ABOUT CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES

6144

GUIDELINES FOR TEACHING ABOUT CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES 6144

Criteria for Determining Appropriateness of Controversial Issues for the School Curriculum

  1. The topics selected for study must contribute to the achievement of the major objectives of the school curriculum.
  2. The topics will be considered appropriate and acceptable areas of study by a large segment of students and citizens of the community.
  3. The educational curriculum will not include or promote religious indoctrination and teachers are to avoid advocating for or against a particular religion while serving the interests of Meriden Public Schools. This should not prevent or discourage the teaching of religions as an educational reality, the comparison or history of various religions, or the study of the influence of religions upon our society, our country’s values, or those of other societies.
  4. Controversial issues treated in curricular activities will be consistent with and appropriate to the knowledge, maturity, and competence of the particular students involved.
  5. Problems and issues selected for discussion and study will be current, significant, and of interest to students.
  6. The issues studied will be allotted only that amount of time required for a satisfactory study by the class.

RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

  1. Students have a right to study and discuss controversial issues and problems in a class atmosphere devoid of partisanship and bias.
  2. Students have the responsibility to learn and practice the techniques of participatory democracy in preparation for carrying out the duties of intelligent, involved citizens.
  3. Students have a right to an explanation by the teacher if an issue is not to be studied.
  4. Students have a responsibility to undertake the study of all sides of an issue, to listen to other viewpoints with an open mind, and to evaluate issues on an intellectual, rather than an emotional basis.

RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE TEACHER

  1. The teacher has discretion to determine whether the issue raised is to be considered at the moment; whether there will be time to explore the issue sufficiently; what the relation of the problem to be considered is to the course or the curriculum; whether the students are prepared or ready to study the issue; and whether the teacher is prepared to discuss and present it effectively.
  2. The students will be instructed in the importance of the reason for considering controversial issues. If an issue is not to be studied the teacher has an obligation to explain the reasons.
  3. The teacher, as a moderator and a participant, will point out the possibility of errors in statements of students and writers and the possibility of alternative points of view. The teacher will see that facts, evidence, and aspects of an issue are honestly presented and that students are helped to evaluate their sources of data as well as their own procedure and conclusions.
  4. Teachers have the right to express their opinions provided the students understand which is opinion and not an authoritative answer. Teachers will not attempt to limit or control the judgment of students, directly or indirectly, and they must avoid indoctrination.
  5. The teacher has a right to protection from pressures that demand withholding of important facts.
  6. The teacher will uphold, protect and defend the fundamental freedoms of our American democratic way of life.

RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE ADMINISTRATION

  1. A teacher who is in doubt about the appropriateness of discussing certain controversial issues in the classroom or regarding his/her ability to explore such issues will confer with his/her department chairperson (at the secondary level). If doubt still continues, the matter is to be brought to the attention of the school principal before being pursued in class. If principal and teacher are unable to agree, the matter will be referred to the Assistant Superintendent.
  2. No group or individual has the right, without authorization, to present arguments for or against any issue under study directly to students or to the class. The teacher, however, after obtaining approval of the department chairperson or principal, may invite representatives of different viewpoints to appear before the class to discuss their opinions.

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended December 6, 2016

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HF1.1R

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

6145.3

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 6145.3

The Board encourages the use of school-sponsored publications to express students’ points of view. They shall follow the normal rules for responsible journalism (the avoidance of libel, obscenity, defamation, false statements, or material advocating prejudice or discrimination.) Student publications shall provide as much opportunity as possible for the sincere expression of student opinion.

Cross Reference:

Policy 1420 (News Media Relations)

Policy 1325 (Advertising in the Schools)

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016

 

Previous Policy Number: HF3.2



Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HF3.2

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

6146

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS                                6146

High school diplomas will be granted only to students who satisfy the following requirements:

Meriden Graduation Requirements:  21.25 Credits

English

4 Credits

Social Studies (must include Civics and U.S History

3 Credits

Mathematics

3 Credits

Science (one must be in Biology)

2 Credits

Art/Vocational

1 Credit

Physical Education

1.5 Credits

Business/Computer

1 Credit

Health

0.5 Credit

Electives

5 Credits

Community Service

0.25

Meriden Graduation with Credit Distinction Requirements:  25.25 Credits

Meriden Graduation with Highest Credit Distinction Requirements:  28.25 Credits

Courses in Art, Music or Theater qualify for the Arts requirement.  Computer courses, along with offerings in the Business and Vocational Education Departments, meet the Business and Vocational Education requirements. 

 Use of State Mastery Tests for Graduation

Smarter Balanced Assessments Graduation Requirement

 

Category 

 Meets Graduation Requirement

 Alternative Indicator of Success

 Exceeds Mastery

Yes 

N/A 

Achieves Mastery 

Yes 

N/A 

Approaching Mastery 

Yes 

N/A 

Below Mastery 

No 

Minimum overall GPA of 3.0 

Or

    For each tested area below master on the Smarter Balanced Assessments, students must demonstrate success in one of the following indicators in that core content area:

Minimum 2.33 GPA

C or higher grade in one ECE or AP course

Score of 39 on PSAT

Score of 450 on SAT

ACT Score of 17 or higher

Accuplacer standard score of 88 or higher

Successful completion of a Personalized Learning Experience (PLE) in senior year

Proficiency on District Assessment

Passing grade on alternative assignment

 

Science Connecticut Academic Performance Test

Graduation Requirement

 

Category 

 Meets Graduation Requirement

 Alternative Indicator of Success

5

Advanced

Yes

N/A

 Goal

Yes 

N/A 

Proficient 

Yes 

N/A 

Basic

No 

 

Below Basic 

No 

Minimum overall GPA of 3.0 

Or

    Students must demonstrate success in one of the following indicators in the science content area:

Minimum GPA of 2.33 in science

C or higher grade in one ECE or AP course

Score of 550 on one science SAT

ACT Score of 17 or higher

Successful completion of a science PLE in senior year

Proficiency on District Assessment

Passing grade on school-based alternative assignment

 Course Loads

Students are required to carry a minimum of six course units yearly; however, senior students may request a waiver from the school principal if they document active participation in approved college and career readiness activities.  

Generally, students are expected to satisfy the graduation requirements listed in this policy in grades nine through twelve, inclusive.  However, a student may receive credit for courses successfully completed in grades seven or eight of any course, the primary focus of which corresponds directly to the subject matter of a specified course requirement in grades nine through twelve, inclusive.  Additionally, a student may receive credit towards the high school graduation requirement for the successful completion of a World Language Course completed in grades six, seven or eight.  Students may also receive credit through pre-approved online coursework or for coursework offered through a non-profit provider, provided the student achieves a passing grade on an examination prescribed by the Commissioner of Education for up to four units.  Students may also earn units toward reaching a graduation requirement by passing a proficiency examination approved by the Commissioner of Education or upon successful completion of coursework at an accredited institution of higher education.  The school principal may waive up to one unit of study in any given year for a student when warranted because of academic or family hardship circumstances.

 Transfer Credit

Only transfer credits earned from high schools accredited by their state accrediting agencies will be accepted in fulfillment of the required 21.25 units except as described above.

Prior approval from the principal is necessary to pursue transfer credit/credit opportunities from accredited institutions other than high school, except as described above.

Attendance Requirements

Students eligible to receive a high school diploma and participate in a graduation ceremony must have attended a Meriden high school for the full and final semester before graduation. Exceptions from this policy may be made by the Superintendent after reviewing special cases with the high school administration.

 

 Legal Reference:

 

Connecticut General Statutes, Section 10-221

Public Act 84-297

Approved September 4, 1984

Amended May 3, 1994

Amended June 1, 1999

Amended March 19, 2002

Amended December 16, 2003

Amended March 6, 2007

Amended February 2, 2010

Amended February 7, 2012

Amended April 28, 2015

Amended June 7, 2016

Reviewed and no changes made: December 6, 2016

Amended May 16, 2017

 Previous Policy Number: HK6

 

Approved 5/16/2017
Previous Policy Number: HK6

Waiver for Policy 6146-Graduation Requirements

6146-E

Please click on the link below:

 

/uploads/6146_Exhibit_Waiver_for_Policy_6146_Grad_Req_.pdf

Approved 5/16/2017
Previous Policy Number:

WEIGHTED GRADING POLICY

6146.1

WEIGHTED GRADING POLICY 6146.1

It is the policy of the Board of Education that a grade in an honors class or an advanced placement class is given added weight for purposes of calculating grade point average and determining class rank. The administration shall publish a formula for calculation of grade point average and class rank reflecting the weighted grading system. The Superintendent or his/her designee shall ensure that parents are notified of this policy.

Legal Reference:

Conn. Gen. Stat. § 10-220g

Approved November 3, 1999

Amended December 6, 2016

 

Previous Policy Number: HK7





Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HK7

High School Diplomas for Special Education Students

6146.1 (R)

High School Diplomas for Special Education Students 6146.1 (R)

Meriden’s position is one of serving special education students in a positive and productive manner while also protecting the integrity of the Board’s graduation requirements. The guidelines listed below should be utilized by staff in dealing with this issue for special education students within or out of the district.

  1. In-District Placements
  2. Graduation requirements for special education students at Platt and Maloney High Schools shall be the same as those of the general school population.
  3. Credits may be earned in regular or special classes, depending on recommendations of the student’s planning and placement team.
  4. In cases where students are unable to meet course objectives, the planning and placement team will determine what constitutes completion of requirements after reviewing the regular course objectives.
  5. This plan will be effective with the class of 1989.
  6. Out-of-District Placements
  7. While it is our legal educational obligation to develop individualized educational programs (IEPs) for placed-out students, it is not to be assumed that such a program or other educational recommendations set forth by planning and placement teams supersede established Board policy for graduation requirements. Simply stated, students must meet the requirements of the Board for graduation in order to be awarded a high school diploma.
  8. When a high school student is placed out as a result of a decision made by a planning and placement team, our priority should be one of working closely with the institution in question to see that the IEP is developed and carried out in keeping with the needs of the student. The consideration of shaping the program with graduation requirements in mind should only be addressed if warranted by current educational circumstances. If and when it is educationally sound the address the student’s standing in terms of graduation requirements while continuing on a placed-out status, such a review is to be directly and closely overseen by our staff. In this instance, careful consideration should be given to possibly returning the student in question to either Maloney or Platt as a base for programming, recognizing that such a move would have to be carefully designed and well supported.
  9. Should a circumstance develop where it appears as though a handicapped student might be denied a high school diploma because of what could be interpreted as prejudicial, discriminatory, or educationally arbitrary requirements, consideration could be given to pursuing a waiver from the Board. For example, our physical education requirement should not prevent a child with a physical disability from receiving a diploma if the student has met all other Board requirements. In this instance, an appropriate substitute would probably be considered towards meeting the graduation requirements.

 

Approved July 1, 1987

Amended December 6, 2016

Previous Policy Number: HK6-R






Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HK6-R

TESTING PROGRAM

6146.2

TESTING PROGRAM 6146.2

Standardized testing shall be one method of providing information on the basic items of:

  1. educational needs of the learner
  2. educational achievement of the learner
  3. program evaluation

Formal testing programs shall be utilized to monitor objectively student progress. The major emphasis of the testing program shall be on the appraisal of student potential and achievement. This emphasis stresses that all formal testing be considered as an instructional tool that will facilitate and complement the learning progress of students.

The Superintendent shall provide rules and regulations covering the selection, adoption and administration of tests and the use and dissemination of test results.

Cross Reference:

Policy 6180.11 (Examinations)

Approved April 28, 1981

Reviewed and no changes made: December 6, 2016

Previous Policy Number: HL

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HL

Procedures for Test Selection

6146.21 (R)

Educational tests are selected after careful review by the Systemwide Test Committee. This committee is made up of individuals from a wide variety of educational backgrounds and from all levels of the Meriden Public Schools. The membership includes, but is not restricted to, system and building level administrators, school psychologists, elementary, middle and high school guidance counselors, and teachers at the elementary middle and high school levels.

Test reviews are accomplished in several steps. The initial procedure involves a careful reading of the technical manuals of those tests under consideration. The information contained in the manuals is scrutinized to determine those areas which are evaluated by each particular measuring instrument. Reliability and validity coefficients are generally in the range of .80 to .95. Tests manifesting coefficients below this standard are disregarded.

A careful analysis of the standardization sample is undertaken as part of the review. Consideration is given to the geographic representation of the norming population, the sampling procedure employed, the characteristics of the sample, and the sample size both in total and by grade or age level.

Further analysis is done to determine the racial and ethnic composition of the norming sample as well as its social and economic characteristics to determine if minority representation has been accomplished. Equally important is the determination that efforts have been successful in minimizing racial, sexual and cultural bias so as to avoid content which is unfamiliar to the experience of these groups.

The content validity of a test refers to the extent to which test items match a curriculum. In the case of achievement tests, the issue of the content validity of an instrument requires two important steps. First, the content of the test must be examined in detail through skill outlines presented in the manuals. Second, judgment must be made whether this array is useful to the particular needs of the local situation. Input is sought from the test user, the classroom teacher. A large number of classroom teachers from the grade levels at which the test is administered examine the content of the test through an analysis of the actual test questions. They respond specifically to the appropriateness of each item in relationship to the curriculum, the format of the test, and the appeal of the test to the target populations. A high percentage of those items (approximately 85%) must be found to correspond to each curriculum.

The Test Selection Committee makes recommendations to the Assistant Superintendent who in turn submits these recommendations to the Superintendent. The Superintendent then makes a recommendation to the Board of Education for approval.

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HL-R(1)

Standardized Tests

6146.22 (R)

Following is a list of standardized tests used by the Meriden Public Schools and an indication of the month in which the tests are usually given:

Grade Test Month
K Metropolitan Readiness May
1-8 Gates McGinitie Reading May
3-5 Cognitive Abilities March
3-5-7 Iowa Test of Basic Skills May
7 Cognitive Abilities November
7 Iowa Algebra Aptitude April
8 Differential Aptitude October
9 Ninth Grade Proficiency Tests October
Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HL-R(2)

ACCESS TO INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

6150

ACCESS TO INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS 6150

In accordance with federal law and Board policy, parents shall be permitted access to instructional material used as part of the educational curriculum for any student.

“Instructional Material” means any instructional content that is provided to a student, regardless of its format, including printed or representational materials, audio-visual materials, and materials in electronic or digital formats (such as materials accessible through the Internet). The term does not include academic tests or academic assessments.

Upon request, the administration shall permit parents to inspect any instructional material. The administration shall grant reasonable access to instructional material within a reasonable period of time after a parental request is received.

Legal Reference:

Federal law:

Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, 20 U.S.C. § 1232h, as amended by the Every Student Succeeds Act, Pub. L. 114-95

Approved June 17, 2003

Amended December 6, 2016


Previous Policy Number: HH1.6

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HH1.6

GROUPING FOR INSTRUCTION

6152

 

GROUPING FOR INSTRUCTION 6152

The principal is responsible for student placement in the regular instructional program according to standards set by the Superintendent and approved by the Board.

Cross Reference:

Policy 5040  (Assignment of Students to Schools and Classes)

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016

 

Previous Policy Number: HG1

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HG1

Grouping Procedures (K-12)

6152.1 (R)

Elementary Level

General Organizational Patterns

Elementary schools shall be organized for instruction in self-contained or team formats. Teachers of self-contained classrooms at any elementary grade level may regroup for language arts or other subject areas. Self-contained classes, however, cannot be intermixed with teams. Teams will organize for instruction only among team members.

Instructional Grouping

A.   Authority

The instructional grouping of students at the elementary school level shall be the responsibility of the building Principal. The building Principal shall involve classroom teacher(s) in the instructional grouping process according to the standards set forth in Policy HE-R(1) Instructional Decision-Making Roles (K-12). The instructional grouping of students shall adhere to the standards established by the Superintendent, or his or her designee, and approved by the Board.

B.   Criteria for Instructional Grouping

Instructional grouping at the elementary school level shall: (1) recognize and respect the various academic achievement levels of students; (2) provide students with opportunities to work with one another regardless of academic achievement level; and (3) promote the Board’s mission and goals

At the elementary school level, special emphasis shall be placed on grouping students for instruction without regard to the academic achievement levels of students. It is recognized that instructional grouping of elementary students in language arts and mathematics should, at times, be made in a manner that accounts for differences in academic achievement levels. In language arts, instructional grouping should account for achievement in the area of reading comprehension. Elementary students should be grouped according to common skill needs for phonetic and structural skills instruction in reading. In mathematics, instructional grouping should account for students’ individual skill needs. Students should be grouped for science and social studies without regard for academic achievement level whenever possible.

Middle School Level

General Organizational Patterns

Middle schools are organized for instruction on an interdisciplinary team-teaching basis. All academic subjects are provided for students within their assigned teams.

Instructional Grouping

A.   Authority

The instructional grouping of students at the middle school level shall be the responsibility of the building Principal. The building Principal shall involve classroom teacher(s) in the instructional grouping process according to the standards set forth in Policy HE-R(1) Instructional Decision-Making Roles (K-12). The instructional grouping of students shall adhere to the standards established by the Superintendent, or his or her designee, and approved by the Board.

B.   Criteria for Instructional Grouping

Instructional grouping at the middle school level shall:  (1) recognize and respect the various academic achievement levels of students; (2) provide students with opportunities to work with one another regardless of academic achievement level; and (3) promote the Board’s mission and goals.

Each team shall be assigned a group of students that is representative of the normal range of learning abilities. Assignments to homerooms and non-academic subjects shall be made without regard for the academic achievement levels of students. Assignments to academic subjects may account for the academic achievement levels of students, within parameters established by the Superintendent or his or her designee.

High School Level

General Organizational Patterns

High schools are organized for instruction on a subject area departmental basis. Interdisciplinary instructional strategies and teaming are encouraged.

Instructional Grouping

A.   Authority

The instructional grouping of students at the high school level shall be the responsibility of the building Principal. The building Principal shall involve classroom teacher(s) in the instructional grouping process according to the standards set forth in Policy HE-R(1) Instructional Decision-Making Roles (K-12).  The instructional grouping of students shall adhere to the standards established by the Superintendent, or his or her designee, and approved by the Board.

B.   Criteria for Instructional Grouping 

Instructional grouping at the high school level shall: (1) recognize and respect the various academic achievement levels of students; (2) provide students with opportunities to work with one another regardless of academic achievement level; and (3) promote the Board’s mission and goals.

At the high school level, assignments to non-academic subjects shall be made without regard for the academic achievement levels of students. Assignments to academic subjects may account for the academic achievement levels of students, within parameters established by the Superintendent or his or her designee.

Cross Reference:

Policy 6119 (Organization of Instruction)
Policy 6119.1 (School Organization)
Policy 6140.2 (R) (Instructional Decision-Making Roles (K-12)
Policy 6152 (Instructional Arrangements)
Policy 5122 (Assignment of Students to Schools and Classes)

Approved 9/1/2009
Previous Policy Number: HG1-R(1)

Providing Remedial Assistance As Required by Connecticut General Statues Section 10-14m-r

6152.2 (R)

Remedial assistance as defined in Section 10-14m-r of the Connecticut General Statutes is made available to students as provided for in Meriden’s Plan for Educational Evaluation and Remedial Assistance (EERA). The implementation of Meriden’s EERA Plan is described in the booklet, Educational Evaluation and Remedial Assistance. Copies of the booklet are available through the Research & Evaluation Specialist or the Office of the Assistant Superintendent for Instruction.

The basic elements of Meriden’s EERA Plan are:

  1. Remedial assistance is provided for students in grades one through twelve.
  2. In grades one-three, locally developed criteria have been established to determine entry into and exiting from remedial assistance.
  3. In grades four-twelve, entry and exiting from remedial assistance is determined by student performance on the statewide mastery tests.
  4. Remedial assistance is provided in the classroom setting or a clinic/lab placement.
  5. Records are maintained for all students in remedial assistance.
  6. Test data is analyzed to determine student performance, to gauge the short-term and long-term effectiveness of remedial assistance, and to assist in determining modifications in the overall instructional program.
  7. Parents are kept informed as to the progress of their children who are receiving remedial assistance.
  8. An annual report is made to the Board of Education on the status of Meriden’s EERA Plan.
  9. The Research & Evaluation Specialist oversees the implementation of Meriden’s EERA Plan.
Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HG1-R(2)

Programs for Exceptional Students

6152.2 (R)

REFERRAL PROCEDURE

Students may be referred for special services or programs by parents, teachers, physicians, agencies, etc., to the school principal or directly to the Office of Pupil Personnel Programs. Children must be 2.8 years by January first of the school year to be eligible for services.

Prior to an evaluation, a team of staff members will meet to discuss a referral and to determine the information needed to make a proper diagnosis. If an evaluation is required, the parent or guardian will be requested to give written permission for evaluative services.

PLANNING AND PLACEMENT TEAM (PPT)

The Planning and Placement Team refers to a group of professional staff members selected from our teaching, administrative, and pupil personnel staff. The Planning and Placement Team may consist of the following: the child’s teacher, principal, school psychologist, social worker, nurse, speech and hearing clinician, special education teacher, or other professionals who may aid in providing the best possible services for the individual child. The parent or guardian of the student under consideration is always invited to attend the PPT meeting. The functions of the PPT are:

  1. To make an evaluation study of any student referred to the team.
  2. To determine whether the child requires special education and/or services.
  3. To recommend to the Coordinator of Pupil Personnel Programs and/or the appropriate administrator such placement and plans for special instruction or services which will be of benefit to the student.
  4. To review annually the progress of any child for whom special education has been recommended and provided during the academic year.

DUE PROCESS RIGHTS

Section 10-76h of the General Statutes, as amended to reflect the requirements of Federal Law 94-142 provides an important mechanism by which parents may enforce their child’s special education rights.

Copies of the Due Process Rights are available at all schools and at the Office of Pupil Personnel Services.

EVALUATION

The school psychologist is available to evaluate the behavior of children and adolescents and to diagnose the causes of learning difficulties and emotional disturbance through observation and the administration of an individual battery of psychological tests. The psychologist communicates with teachers, administrators and other school staff through written and/or verbal reports. Through case conferences, consultation and classroom observation, the psychologist helps develop individualized programs of instruction where needed, and suggests techniques to elicit greater individual motivation, achievement and adjustment. As part of the evaluation, the psychologist consults with parents to increase their understanding of the child’s needs, to enlist their cooperation, and to develop their understanding of the child’s school program.

Every attempt is made to evaluate preschool children within the local system. The nature of a child’s problem sometimes dictates that an evaluation be carried out at a facility especially equipped to deal with such a youngster. On these occasions, the preschool or school-age child may be referred to an appropriate clinical or medical setting for a thorough diagnosis and for the development of an educational plan to deal with the area of difficulty.

MECCA/OLA

The MECCA/OLA Program is directed at youngsters in kindergarten and first grade who display developmental delays and/or who have learning disabilities. Screening is done to determine those youngsters in need of services after which extra help is given within the child’s classroom. The learning disability teacher works with small groups of children and develops motor, perceptual, conceptual and readiness skills. Follow-up exercises are provided by the child’s teacher or by the aide.

MENTALLY RETARDED

A special education program is provided within the Meriden Public Schools for trainable and educable mentally retarded children. The major purpose of these programs is to provide basic knowledge, communication, social and vocational skills through individualized instruction provided by the special education teacher and the classroom aide. These services are provided within a small group learning situation. Those youngsters able to benefit from regular class programs are placed in carefully-selected academic subjects in addition to participating in such non-academic areas as art, music, physical education, home economics and shop. All placements of this type are closely monitored by the special and regular classroom teachers.

As part of the program, each child is given a formal psychological evaluation every three years to assess progress and to provide information to aid in further planning.

LEARNING DISABILITIES

A learning disabled child is one who demonstrates a severe discrepancy between educational performance and measured intellectual ability and who exhibits a disorder in one or more of the following processes: listening, speaking, reading, writing, spelling, calculating or reasoning. Resource rooms are housed in all fourteen schools to remediate learning disabilities.

Primary, intermediate, and middle school self-contained learning disabilities programs are in operation in three schools to service the severely learning disabled students who require full-time placement in the program.

SERVICES FOR THE VISUALLY HANDICAPPED

If a child has a serious vision problem and especially if he is legally blind, he should be referred to the Office of Pupil Personnel Programs. The instructor for children who are visually handicapped will then discuss the matter with the parent or guardian and with the family ophthalmologist and arrange for appropriate services if needed.

PROGRAM FOR ACADEMIC AND SOCIAL SUCCESS (PASS)

The emotionally disturbed/socially maladjusted child is one whose behavior is dysfunctional because of his/her either extremely withdrawn or acting-out nature. This behavior interferes with the education of the referred child and regular class members.

These students are eligible for enrollment in PASS classes which are small, highly structured classes staffed with a teacher and an aide who employ a humanistic educational approach and a behavior modification program to develop appropriate social interaction skills which will allow them to be more receptive to educational experiences. The daily program is designed to foster social and emotional growth in children in positive, healthful ways to assist in the development of adaptive behaviors for learning.

PLACED OUT SERVICES

The Meriden Public Schools provide a large number of programs to meet the specific needs of its students. The individual needs of some children, however, may be so unique as to require a program which is not available within the district. In such cases, the school system with the consent of the parent places the youngster in a school setting outside of the local school system which can help the child meet his/her needs. As with other children, the Meriden Public Schools provides for both the transportation and education of the child. Each child’s progress is evaluated periodically, usually at the end of the school year, and a determination is made as to the appropriateness of returning the youngster to the local school system on either a part of full-time basis.

SPEECH, LANGUAGE AND HEARING SERVICES

Children who have difficulty with their speech, ability to use and understand language effectively or have problems associated with a hearing loss often need to be serviced by the school’s speech pathologist. The speech pathologist evaluates, diagnoses, identifies, remediates and counsels communicatively handicapped children. Service is provided for youngsters, preschoolers, as well as children enrolled in our public schools whose communicative skills interfere with their educational, social and emotional placement in the program for treatment of a communicative disorder. The child continues to receive servicing until he/she reaches his/her appropriate level of communicative ability. Early intervention helps to alleviate the problem, assists in preventing other contributory aspects from developing further, and assists in the child’s total development.

SCHOOL SOCIAL WORK

The Board of Education employs school social workers in our secondary schools to provide for special needs. One of their services is to help the schools provide the kind of educational atmosphere and understanding that will assist in preventing problems from developing. They also offer counseling services for individuals or groups of students who are experiencing personal, emotional and/or family problems which interfere with their learning process. They assist teachers, pupils, parents and administrators to adjust programs or activities in order to solve or overcome specific personal problems. Often they are able to find community agencies which can be helpful to parents and students.

HOME-SCHOOL COMMUNITY PROGRAM

There are three home-school community workers employed by the Board of Education. A Spanish-speaking coordinator and educator provide service to the Spanish community. They are assigned to help children and families who may not speak English fluently or who may not be familiar with various school procedures. There is also a community educator who aids black children and parents in the school and in the neighborhood. All the community workers provide information, guidance, or services needed by students and/or parents. If a parent has need of such assistance, a telephone call to their youngster’s school can readily result in an appointment with the home-school coordinator or the home-school community educators.

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HF2.1-R(1)

Independent Study Program

6152.31 (R)

An Independent Study Program is available to students at the high school level in grades ten through twelve. Independent study provides students with an opportunity to carry out a program of study in a field of interest not readily available in the regular curriculum. A student desiring to pursue such a program has the responsibility to initiate application for independent study, to organize and complete a project proposal, and to select a faculty sponsor. Application and project proposal forms are available from guidance counselors.

Independent study units earned may be counted toward graduation requirements. Student evaluation will be determined by the independent study sponsor, but a final student report will be submitted to the Independent Study Committee and only then will credit be awarded. A student may earn a maximum of one unit of credit.

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HG2-R

FIELD TRIPS AND EXCURSIONS

6153

The Board considers student trips or excursions made for educational, cultural or recreational purposes as valuable experiences. Such trips and excursions shall be planned and supervised by authorized personnel and approved by the principal and by such other administrators as may be required. The Board accepts responsibility only for school-sponsored trips, including those special trips for which it provides funds that fall within the limits set forth below:

Those primarily educational trips which emerge from the classroom and which may be so closely related to the instructional programs that every effort should be made to ensure that each student participates if possible. Such trips should be designed to help students to a better understanding of their studies by reinforcing, supplementing or extending learning.

Those cultural, enriching or recreational trips which may emerge either from the classroom or from an approved extracurricular club, organization, program or activity. Such trips, while also designed to broaden and enhance a student’s educational experiences, are usually not so related to the curriculum as to require a student’s participation and, thus, participation may be limited.

Planning of all trips shall include:

a definite statement of the purposes and reason for the trip;

sufficient advance notification about the trip to the parents of students involved;

a review of insurance needs and coverage, especially for trips involving hazardous activities and, if necessary, arrangement for special separate and personally funded insurance coverage for staff and students made in consultation with Board counsel;

arrangements made within the school for students not participating;

provision for supervision on the trip;

provision for lodging, if needed, and safe, insured transportation;

an attempt to control the cost of trips so that a student’s opportunity to participate shall not be limited by financial circumstances; and

means by which costs for the trip are met (such as fund-raising efforts, student payment, etc.)

The three types of field trips are defined below. The school principal may approve area field trips. Extended trips will require the approval of the Superintendent upon recommendation of the principal. Special trips will require the approval of the Board upon the recommendation of the Superintendent.

Area trips - day trips with a radius of 125 miles from Meriden

Extended trips - trips beyond the 125 miles radius but less than a 500 mile radius from Meriden

Special trips - trips beyond a 500 mile radius from Meriden

Activities of non-school groups or individuals are not considered field trips and, as such, do not fall under the purview of schools. Teachers or any other school personnel who plan trips that are not school sponsored must alert parents and students that the planned trip is not associated with the Meriden Public Schools. Personnel planning such trips must clearly indicate in writing that they are serving as private agents or private individuals. The planning of these trips shall not be done on school time or use school facilities and shall not use the schools as a communication device. The Meriden Public Schools assumes no liability in connection with such trips.

Cross Reference:

Policy 5181.3 (Authorized Transportation Services)

 

Approved 4/28/1981
Amended 4/6/1999 

Approved 4/6/1999
Previous Policy Number: HH3.1

General Guidelines for Field Trips

6153.4 (R)

GUIDELINES FOR CULTURAL, ENRICHING OR RECREATIONAL TRIPS NOT HAVING A DIRECT, EXPLICIT CONNECTION TO ESTABLISHED CURRICULUM

Field trips of this nature are to be limited to no more than three trips annually totaling no more than five (5) days absent from school without the expressed written consent of the Principal.

The Principal is encouraged to limit student participation on field trips in cases where there are established academic, attendance or behavioral concerns.

UTILIZATION OF FIELD TRIP MONIES

  1. All field trips must be in keeping with established Board policy.
  2. Decisions regarding the funding of area field trips will rest with the Principal. In those instances where art, bilingual, music, special education, or vocational education activities may be involved, the Principal should coordinate with the appropriate supervisor or vice versa.
  3. Field trips are handled on a bid basis with information regarding the selection of a transportation firm to follow at a later date.
  4. The pool of money for field trips is assigned to schools on a per pupil allotment basis.
  5. This procedure and related funds in no way applies to athletic transportation or the purchase of admission tickets.

PROPOSED TRIP

The Field Trip Request form must be sent to the Principal at least twelve school days before the date of the proposed trip, stating reasons for the trip, time, date, place, cost (to school or student), number of students and teachers involved, grade level, and the number of parents to be used as chaperones. Please state the activities prior to the trip and activities to be held as a follow-through of the trip.

A permission slip for parents must be submitted to the appropriate administrator for approval before sending to parents. This slip must be typed and this is the responsibility of the teacher.

APPROVED TRIP

Approved permission slips are to be sent to parents. Included in the slip must be stated the reason for the trip, time of departure, approximate time of return, place and cost. This must be sent to the parents at least six days before the trip is to be taken. (No student will be allowed to go on the trip without a signed permission slip.) Calls will not be made for permission the day of the trip.

A list of the names of chaperones must be sent to the Principal.

A list of names of students and teachers involved must be sent to the Principal.

A list of names of students not going and the arrangements made for them must be sent to the Principal. (These arrangements are to be made by the teacher or teachers taking the trip at least two days prior to the trip.)

Names of any students who cannot afford to go must be forwarded to the Principal. (Limited funds might be used in these special cases.)

Any deviation from listed procedures may result in delay or rejection of the trip.

Safety is always of the utmost importance. Field trips should be a regular part of the total education program and are the responsibility of the classroom teacher.

Approved 10/17/2006
Previous Policy Number: HH3.1-R

HOMEWORK

6154

HOMEWORK 6154

The Board recognizes that homework is a learning activity and an important adjunct to regular class work at all grade levels. It should increase in complexity commensurate with the maturity of the student.

Homework should be an application or adaptation of a classroom experience; it should not be assigned for disciplinary purposes.

Suggestions for homework shall be established for all grade levels in accordance with guidelines developed by the administration. Teachers shall use these guidelines, except in those specific situations where educational needs dictate otherwise. Homework assignments are to be promptly corrected by the teacher and returned to the student with appropriate notations.

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016


Previous Policy Number: HK3

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HK3

Administrative Procedures for Homework (Grades K-12)

6154.1 (R)

Administrative Procedures for Homework (Grades K-12) 6154.1 (R)

RATIONALE FOR HOMEWORK

  1. Homework keeps parents in touch with the school program and their child’s progress, thus creating a closer bond between home and school.
  2. Homework teaches the student to follow directions and to organize time.
  3. Homework teaches the student to accept responsibility and develop self-reliance in school work. It improves study skills and work habits.
  4. Homework reinforces school learning and gives needed drill on work taken up in class.
  5. The amount of knowledge required by the curriculum simply cannot be imparted during school hours alone.

WHAT PARENTS CAN EXPECT FROM TEACHERS REGARDING HOMEWORK

  1. Parents can expect that the assignment given will be specific and will have been explained in class. Preferably, the student will have started it while in class under the guidance of the teacher to be sure it is understood.
  2. Parents can expect that teachers will not give homework for disciplinary reasons.
  3. When homework is completed and turned in, parents should know that it will be carefully evaluated by the teacher and returned to the student in a timely fashion.
  4. Parents can expect that assignments will not require the use of books or other materials which are not available in the home unless arrangements have been made to provide these items.

5 Homework should be assigned only when it clearly serves a purpose. When assigned reading, for example, students need to be told whether they are to learn specific facts, whether they are to look for the main ideas in the material, etc. Thus, parents have a right to expect that teachers will plan homework carefully in terms of the outcomes desired and the time needed to do the work.

  1. Parents can expect homework to be within the student's ability.

WHAT TEACHERS CAN EXPECT FROM PARENTS REGARDING HOMEWORK

  1. Teachers can expect that parents will arrange a quiet, suitable place, with adequate work space, for the student to work.
  2. Teachers can expect that the parents will cooperate by encouraging their child to complete homework assignments.
  3. Teachers also can expect parents to understand the value of various types of homework, since the value differs under different circumstances.

CHARACTERISTICS OF GOOD HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS

  1. Homework should be carefully planned, the students motivated to complete the assignments. Assignments should be definite, interesting, meaningful, and geared to individual abilities.
  2. The teacher should take shared responsibility with the parent for helping the student to form efficient study habits.
  3. Homework assignments should be made only after the student understands the process and has had enough preparation in class to do homework on the subject unaided.
  4. Homework assignments should be of a type which can be better done away from school. This includes collecting information, sharing ideas with parents, and situations in which students are involved in activities like creative writing or preparing reports.

A SUGGESTED HOMEWORK PROCEDURE AND TIME SCHEDULE

Sound homework procedures will ensure that students are not overburdened with homework assignments. From what we know, there is no single time schedule that will be effective over a long period of time. Even so, in developing homework procedures, we can consider what many authorities believe to be time allotments suitable for the majority of students, assuming the other criteria for sound homework assignments have been met. With these points in mind, the following time schedule for the various levels will serve as a guide for staff in assigning homework.

Grade Level - Time Schedule

Grade 1  - A daily average of 15 minutes

Grade 2  - A daily average of 20 minutes

Grade 3 - A daily average of 30 minutes

Grades 4-5 - A daily average of 40 minutes

Grades 6-8 - A daily average of 50 minutes

Grades 9-12:

Academic/Accelerated - A daily average of 60 minutes

AP/ECE - A daily average of 90 minutes

 

Individual schools are to establish procedures to be sure that teachers coordinate homework assignments. In this way, students will not be inadvertently assigned an unrealistic amount of work. Homework assignments are to be kept to a minimum during holidays and vacations.

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended December 6, 2016

Previous Policy Number: HK3-R





Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HK3-R

TEACHER AIDES

6159.1

The Board sanctions the use of teacher aides for instructional and non-instructional assistance, under the supervision of a regular teacher, where such use is advisable in fulfilling the educational responsibilities of the system.

The use of teacher aides shall be in accordance with standards set by the Superintendent and approved by the Board.

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HH2.1

Recommendation Form for the Program for Gifted and Talented

6159.2 (E)

View / download RECOMMENDATION FORM FOR THE PROGRAM FOR GIFTED/TALENTED (printable PDF)

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HF2.1-E(2)

TEXTBOOK SELECTION AND ADOPTION

6160

TEXTBOOK SELECTION AND ADOPTION 6160

No change of basic textbooks shall be made except by two-thirds vote of all members of the Board and after notice of intent to change has been given at a meeting of the Board at least one week previous to the vote upon such change.

Cross Reference:

Policy 6161 (Selection and Adoption)

Legal Reference:

Connecticut General Statutes, Section 10-229

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number:

Request for Review of Text or Supplementary Classroom Material or Program Area

6160.1 (E)

View / download REQUEST FOR REVIEW OF TEXT OR SUPPLEMENTARY CLASSROOM MATERIAL OR PROGRAM AREA (printable PDF)

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HH1.2-E(1)

Textbook Adoption Form

6160.2 (E)

View / download TEXTBOOK ADOPTION FORM (printable PDF)

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HH1.2-E(2)

Suggested Criteria for Selecting Health Materials

6160.3 (E)

View / download SUGGESTED CRITERIA FOR SELECTING HEALTH MATERIALS (printable PDF)

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HH1.2-E(3)

Procedures for the Selection and Re-evaluation of Textbooks and Supplementary Classroom Materials

6160.4 (R)

Procedures for the Selection and Re-evaluation of Textbooks and Supplementary Classroom Materials 6160.1 (R)

Part I: Selection of Textbooks & Supplementary Classroom Materials

Procedures for Textbook Selection

Curriculum development determines textbook selections; textbooks should not determine curriculum. This statement forms the foundation for the selection of textbooks and other classroom materials utilized in the Meriden Public Schools. Great care is taken to ensure that selected texts and other materials represent the highest intellectual and production standards and are consistent with the policies of the Meriden Board of Education.

  1. Basic textbooks are to be reviewed by the appropriate system wide curriculum committees every five years or more frequently if the need arises as indicated through teacher input or other needs assessment activities.
  2. At the secondary level, where the search for a new text may have been initiated at the department level within a school, such departmental recommendations are to be reviewed by the appropriate system wide curriculum committees before being finalized.
  3. Recommendations for new textbooks are to be submitted to the Assistant Superintendent annually. Once endorsed, the Assistant Superintendent will recommend textbooks to the Superintendent for adoption by the Board.
  4. The steps listed below are to be followed when reviewing textbooks for selection:
  5. A review of current trends in the particular subject area is to be conducted.
  6. The needs and interests of students are to be determined and considered.
  7. Specific criteria are to be established by which textbooks will be reviewed and evaluated. In general, a selected text is to reflect the following characteristics:

1) The text supports the objectives of the curriculum.

2) The text reflects high academic and publishing standards.

3) The text avoids stereotypes and treats all segments of our society in a fair and representative manner.

4) The text treats issues of a controversial nature in such a way as to provide information regarding all the major differing views.*

5) Written and/or oral reports of piloted projects or other research involving the textbook under consideration are to be reviewed.

 

  1. A process for obtaining feedback and generally evaluating the effectiveness of a textbook (once adopted) is to be established.
  2. Once a textbook has been adopted, the appropriate curriculum committee will arrange, as deemed appropriate, in-service workshops to acquaint staff with the best techniques for employing the text.

*In the case of health related materials, a listing of specific criteria has been developed and should be utilized when selecting items in this area.

Procedures for the Selection of Supplementary Classroom Materials

  1. If such materials are to be used as a basic instructional tool, then they are to be reviewed and recommended in keeping with the procedures outlined in the Procedures for Textbook Selection.
  2. If such materials are to be used on a supplemental basis, then they may be selected at the building/departmental level. However, the materials are to meet the criteria listed in Procedure #4 under Procedures for Textbook Selection.

Part II: Re-evaluation of Textbooks & Supplementary Classroom Materials

Re-evaluation Procedures

  1. All complaints to staff members shall be reported to the building principal whether received by telephone, letter or in personal conversation.
  2. The principal shall contact the complainant to discuss the complaint and attempt to resolve it informally.
  3. If the complaint is not resolved informally, the complainant shall be provided a form to request re-evaluation (Form 6160.1(E). The principal will inform the Superintendent of what has transpired.
  4. When completed, the form is to be returned to the building principal who will forward a copy to the Superintendent. The material will be reviewed by the appropriate K-12 curriculum committee. A report of the committee’s review will be sent to the person requesting re-evaluation, the school principal, and the Superintendent.
  5. If the person requesting re-evaluation is not satisfied, a written request may be made to the Superintendent of Schools for further consideration. This request must include a copy of the completed request form, the curriculum committee’s reply, and should indicate the area(s) of dissatisfaction.
  6. The Superintendent shall establish an ad hoc review committee to include:

 

  1. Teachers competent in the area of the content covered by the text or supplementary material.
  2. Administrators and supervisors appropriate to the level and/or subject for which the material is used.
  3. The Superintendent’s action on a written request shall be taken no later than fifteen (15) school days after receipt of the request. The person making the request will be notified of the date of the review at least seven (7) days in advance.
  4. The requesting person may make an oral presentation of fifteen minutes or less to the review committee, if scheduled through the Superintendent’s office at least three (3) days before the review.
  5. A written report from the review committee shall be submitted to the Superintendent. The Superintendent shall then communicate his/her decision to the person requesting the re-evaluation, the school principal and the appropriate curriculum committee.
  6. Should the decision of the Superintendent not satisfy the person requesting the re-evaluation, the Board will review the Superintendent’s decision within fifteen (15) days of receipt of a written request by the complainant to carry out such a review. The Board’s written response will be rendered within three (3) days of its review.
  7. Once a text or supplementary material has been re-evaluated, the material cannot be subject to further review without special approval by the Board. Challenged materials shall remain in use pending final decision in the matter.

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended December 6, 2017

Previous Policy Number: HH1.2-R(1)





Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HH1.2-R(1)

Systemwide Adopted Materials (K-8)

6160.5 (R)

View / download SYSTEMWIDE ADOPTED MATERIALS (K-8) (printable PDF)

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HH1.2-R(2)

SELECTION AND ADOPTION

6161

SELECTION AND ADOPTION 6161

It is the policy of the Board of Education to provide educational materials and equipment that support and enrich the curriculum and further the achievement of the district’s goals. Insofar as possible, all textbooks and other instructional materials should present balanced views concerning the international, national and local issues and problems of our times.

Materials shall not be excluded solely because of the race, nationality, political or religious views of the writer or his/her style.

While the Board is legally responsible for all matters relating to the adoption of textbooks and purchase of library and other supplementary materials, the responsibility for reviewing and selecting instructional materials is delegated to the administration and appropriate curriculum committee at each of the schools.  The content curriculum committee will review textbooks proposed for adoption.  School administration will approve all library and other supplementary materials..

Materials selected by the school curriculum committees shall:

support the curriculum, taking into consideration the individual’s needs and varied interests, abilities, socio-economic backgrounds and maturity levels of the student served;

provide materials for teachers and students that will encourage growth in knowledge and will develop literary, cultural and aesthetic appreciation and ethical standards;

provide materials which reflect the ideas and beliefs of religious, social, political, historical, and ethnic groups and their contribution to the American and world heritage and culture, thereby enabling students to develop an intellectual integrity in forming judgments.

The needs of the individual school based on the curriculum and the existing collection of instructional materials shall be the first criterion for selection. Materials shall also be selected on the basis of:

overall need;

currency or permanence;

importance of subject matter;

quality of writing/production;

readability and popular appeal;

authoritativeness;

reputation of the publisher/producer;

reputation and significance of the author/artist/composer/producer;

format and price;

requests from faculty and students;

suitability for age level.

Cross Reference:

Policy 6140.1 (Study Committees)

Policy 6160 (Textbook Selection and Adoption)

Policy 1312 (Public Comments)

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016

 

Previous Policy Number: HH1.1

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HH1.1

Request for Re-evaluation of Library/Media Materials

6161.1 (E)

View / download REQUEST FOR RE-EVALUATION OF LIBRARY/MEDIA MATERIALS (printable PDF)

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HH1.1-E

Procedures for Library/Media Materials Selection and Re-evaluation

6161.1 (R)

Procedures for Library/Media Materials Selection and Re-evaluation 6161.1(R)

Introduction

The primary objective of the library/media center is to implement, enrich and support the educational program of the school. The library/media center is intended to provide the school with a wide range of materials on all levels of difficulty, with diversity of appeal, and the presentation of different points of view.

To this end, the Meriden Board of Education subscribes in principle to the statements on library philosophy as expressed by the American Association of School Librarians in the “School Library Bill of Rights”:

  1. To provide a comprehensive collection of instructional materials selected in compliance with basic written selection procedures, and to provide maximum accessibility to these materials.
  2. To provide materials that will support the curriculum, taking into consideration the individual’s needs, and the varied interests, abilities, socio-economic backgrounds, and maturity levels of the students served.
  3. To provide materials for teachers and students that will encourage growth in knowledge and literary, cultural and aesthetic appreciation, and ethical standards.
  4. To provide materials which reflect the ideas and beliefs of religious, social, political, historical and ethnic groups and their contribution to the American and world heritage and culture, thereby enabling students to develop an intellectual integrity in forming judgments.
  5. To provide a written statement, approved by the Board of Education, of the procedures for meeting the challenge of censorship of materials in school library/media centers.
  6. To provide qualified professional personnel to serve teachers and students.

Criteria for Library/Media Materials Selection

The library/media collection shall contain materials that are consistent with the criteria listed below. With regard to what might be considered as controversial issues, a balanced presentation of such matters shall be contained within individual works or within a specified group of books or media that meet other relevant criteria for selection.

  1. Materials shall support and be consistent with the general educational goals of the Meriden Public Schools and its curricula.
  2. Materials shall meet high standards of quality in factual content and presentation.
  3. Materials shall be appropriate for the subject area and for the age, emotional development, ability level and social development of the students for whom the materials are selected.
  4. Materials shall support the development of reading skills and aid instruction in the use of books and library/media centers.
  5. Materials shall have aesthetic, literary, artistic and/or social value of recognized significance.
  6. Materials chosen shall be by competent and qualified authors and producers.
  7. Materials shall be chosen to foster respect and understanding of minority groups, women, ethnic groups and religions and shall realistically and factually represent our pluralistic contemporary society along with the roles and lifestyles open to both men and women.
  8. Materials shall be chosen that examine economic, political and ideological systems and the historical impact of such systems.
  9. Materials shall provide students with opportunities and experiences which foster critical thinking in an atmosphere of free inquiry.
  10. Materials shall present the varied aspects of our society, including some that may be considered undesirable.
  11. Materials shall be selected for their strengths rather than rejected for their weaknesses.
  12. Physical format and appearance of materials shall be of high quality and be appropriate for their intended use.
  13. Materials shall be chosen to foster leisure and recreational reading in order to encourage and develop lifelong reading habits.
  14. Materials are also to be considered on the basis of:

overall purpose

timeliness or permanence

importance of the subject matter

quality of the writing/production

readability and popular appeal

authoritativeness

reputation of the publisher/producer

reputation and significance of the author/artist/composer/producer ,etc.

format and price

requests from faculty and students.

Library/Media Materials Selection Procedures

  1. The Board of Education is legally responsible for all matters relating to the operation of the Meriden Public Schools.
  2. The responsibility for the selection of library/media materials shall reside primarily with professionally trained and certified personnel subject to criteria approved by the Board of Education and subject to Board review. For the purposes of this provision, the terms “library/media materials” or “materials” include printed and audiovisual materials (e.g. books, magazines, films, video tapes, filmstrips, records, audio tapes, etc.) housed in the school library/media center or the system wide Library/Media Center.
  3. The selection of materials involves many people: principals, supervisors, teachers and library/media specialists. The responsibility for coordinating and selection of purchase rests with the professionally trained and certified library/media personnel.
  4. In selecting materials for purchase, the library/media specialist or Supervisor of Library/Media Services evaluates the existing collection and:
  5. consults reputable, unbiased, professionally prepared selection aids;
  6. consults staff rom departments and/or all grade levels; and
  7. in the case of the school library/media specialist, submits recommended selections for review by the school principal.

Part II: Re-evaluation of Library/Media Materials

Introduction

Occasional objections to a selection will be made by the public despite the care taken to select valuable materials for student and teacher use and the qualifications of persons who select the materials.

Community members are reminded that, while they have the right to guide or limit their children in what they read or view, they may not do so by limiting the range of materials available to other children. In particular, materials that parents or guardians of current students judge to be inappropriate for their children should be returned to the school library/media center.

 

Procedures for the Re-evaluation of Library/Media Materials

The following procedures shall be followed whenever there is a request for the re-evaluation of library/media materials whether the materials are assigned to a school library/media center or had been obtained through the system wide Library/Media Center.

  1. All complaints to staff members shall be reported to the building principal, Supervisor of Library/Media Services and the library/media specialist involved, whether received by telephone, letter or in personal conversation.
  2. The principal, Supervisor of Library/Media Services or the library/media specialist shall contact the complainant to discuss the complaint and attempt to resolve it informally.
  3. If the complaint is not resolved informally, the principal or Supervisor of Library/Media Services will provide the complainant with a Request for Re-evaluation of Library/Media Materials form plus copies of reviews of the material in question (when available). The principal or Supervisor of Library/Media Services will inform the Superintendent of what has transpired.
  4. When completed, the form is to be returned to the building principal or Supervisor of Library/Media Services who will forward a copy to the library/media specialist. The completed form and material in question will be reviewed by a Building Library/Media Advisory Council to be appointed by the school principal which will include teachers, an administrator and when appropriate, student representative(s). A report of the council’s review will be sent to the person requesting re-evaluation, the school principal and the Supervisor of Library/Media Services.
  5. If the person requesting re-evaluation is not satisfied, a written request may be made to the Superintendent of Schools for further consideration. This request must include a copy of the completed request form and the Building Library/Media Advisory Council’s reply, and should indicate the area(s) of dissatisfaction.
  6. The Superintendent shall establish an ad hoc review committee to include:
  7. teachers competent in the area of content covered by the print or non-print materials;
  8. administrators and supervisors appropriate to the level and/or subject for which the material is used; and
  9. a library/media specialist.
  10. The Superintendent’s action on a written request shall be taken no later than fifteen (15) school days after receipt of the request. The person making the request is to be notified of the date of the review at least seven (7) days in advance.
  11. The requesting person may make an oral presentation of fifteen minutes or less to the review committee, if scheduled through the Superintendent’s office at least three (3) days before the review.
  12. A written report from the review committee shall be submitted to the Superintendent. The Superintendent shall then communicate his/her decision to the person requesting the re-evaluation.
  13. Should the decision of the Superintendent not satisfy the person requesting the re-evaluation, the Board will review the Superintendent’s decision within fifteen (15) days of receipt of a written request by the complainant to carry out such a review. The Board’s written response will be rendered within three (3) days of its review.
  14. Once library/media material has been re-evaluated, the material cannot be subject to further review without special approval by the Board. Challenged library/media materials shall remain in use pending final decision in the matter.

Approved April 28, 2981

Amended  December 6, 2016

Previous Policy Number: HH1.1-R, 6161.2(R)






Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HH1.1-R

PROGRAMS FOR EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS

6171

PROGRAMS FOR EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS 6171

It is the policy of the Board of Education to provide an equal educational opportunity, consistent with federal and state statutes, for all handicapped children in the Meriden Public Schools.

Legal Reference:

Connecticut General Statutes, Sections 10-76a et seq.

Public Act 94-142

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016

 

Previous Policy Number: HF2.1

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HF2.1

Referral Process and Procedures

6171.11 (E)

View / download printable PDF

1: Referral Process and Procedures

2 - 4: Checklist for Planning and Placement Meetings

5 - 10: Individualized Educational Plan

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HF2.1-E(1)

Gifted / Talented Program

6171.2 (R)

PROGRAM GOAL

Students who exhibit superior academic ability, high achievement, or have outstanding talent will be challenged beyond the limits of the present curriculum.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

The Gifted/Talented Program provides selected grades 6-12 students with the opportunity to participate in an individualized program which is supplementary to the total school curriculum. Students attend special programs or approved private or public schools, such as Talcott Mountain Science Center, on an after-school, weekend or summer basis. Some receive individualized instruction in interest areas by professionals. The Board provides tuition payment and other related costs on a partial or complete basis.

Participants for this program are selected by means of an intensive screening process involving use of test results, teacher and principal recommendations. Participation is voluntary, with parent approval, and based on referrals made by certified staff and the level of available funding.

GENERAL GUIDELINES

  1. The Gifted/Talented Program is offered in addition to the regular curriculum.
  2. Opportunities for students in the curriculum programs within the district should be explored initially before recommendation for placing out.
  3. The Gifted/Talented Program shall follow the procedures of Connecticut Statutes 10-76, laws for special education services.
  4. Students may participate regardless of personal or family resources.
  5. Middle and high school staff shall identify those students who they feel are eligible for this program. This shall be accomplished by using the criteria developed under the student identification procedures. A listing of eligible students shall be placed on file in the Guidance Director’s Office.
  6. Middle and high school staff shall be aware of activities, programs or schools in their area of expertise for which our students have eligibility.

STUDENT IDENTIFICATION

The basic rationale of student identification is to provide multiple criteria which is flexible enough to identify the most outstanding pupils. This criteria, both objective and subjective, must enable us to identify the “extraordinary learning ability,” “gifted and talented” or “outstanding talent in the creative arts” as defined in Section 10-76a of the Connecticut General Statutes and possessed by five percent of the children in our district. Budget restrictions often limit the serving of less than one percent of our student population. Guidelines utilized by the Meriden Public Schools are more stringent than the State of Connecticut General Budget restrictions often limit the serving of less than one percent of our student population. Guidelines utilized by the Meriden Public Schools are more stringent than the State of Connecticut and include one or more of the criteria listed below.

  1. General intellectual ability: I.Q. scores of 130 or above on any two group tests such as the Lorge-Thorndike, Otis-Lennon, Cognitive Abilities Test or on individual intelligence tests such as WISC-R or Stanford Binet.
  2. Academic aptitude: Achievement test scores of the 98th percentile or above.
  3. Visual and performing arts: Demonstrated achievement by solo performance, one person shows, state or local awards, certificates of excellence or some similar standard which denotes recognition in a specific area.
  4. Demonstrated attributes of: Positive leadership, imaginative insight, creative capacity, intense interest and involvement, high potential, advanced skills or specific aptitude.

PLACEMENT PROCEDURES

  1. Referral: Any professional staff member who knows of the special talents of a pupil may initiate the selection process by substantiating minimum criteria and submitting to the pupil’s guidance counselor, or by returning recommendation form. Parents and students themselves may initiate the process by requesting review by the professional staff.
  2. The guidance counselor will proceed to gather data essential for a Planning and Placement Team meeting. The data gathering and evaluative process must be as complete as possible and follow the present procedure for any placed out student. This not only includes the qualifications of the student but also the appropriateness of the receiving school, program or service. The additional resources of the department chairpersons and the supervisor of fine arts are available for evaluation and knowledge of special schools or programs appropriate to a student’s needs.
  3. Planning and Placement Team meeting for recommendation with all appropriate procedures including notification to Coordinator of Pupil Personnel Programs prior to meeting.
  4. Implementation of the services is the responsibility of the school contact person with assistance from the Coordinator’s office. This includes items such as completing application forms, securing transportation, making telephone calls, and so forth.

EVALUATION

Each pupil’s activities will be monitored by the identified school contact person which could be the school counselor, department chairperson, supervisor, teacher or administrator. Please indicate on Individualized Educational Program (I.E.P.) form

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HF2.1-R(2)

Homebound Program

6171.2 (R)

PROGRAM GOALS

  1. As recommended by a licensed physician, the student will receive instruction which maintains the continuity of the regular program.
  2. As recommended by the Planning and Placement Team, the student will receive a special educational program and related services.

DESCRIPTION OF EXISTING PROGRAM

The public schools provide instruction in the home and the hospital for eligible students. Instructional time and procedures are consistent with Section 10-76d of the Connecticut General Statutes.

Generally, students receive instruction when a physician certifies in writing that the child is unable to attend school for medical reasons or pregnancy or when a Planning and Placement Team recommends homebound instruction due to a severe handicapping condition or similar eligibility under state and federal special education laws.

ADMINISTRATION

The Coordinator of Pupil Personnel Programs is the principal of the Homebound Program with concomitant duties, responsibilities and authority. Monitoring of the program is the responsibility of the child’s guidance counselor working with the special service staff, school staff and Pupil Personnel Office. The social worker normally monitors cases of pregnancy. Mutual cooperation between regular school and homebound staffs is essential to provide effective, appropriate and articulated instructions.

LENGTH OF ABSENCE

In order to be eligible to receive homebound instruction, the physician must state the child’s condition will cause an absence of at least three weeks duration. The instruction shall begin no later than two weeks from the first date of absence providing nothing in the child’s condition precludes it.

In instances where a Planning and Placement Team meeting is mandatory, the individualized educational plan will determine all the instructional procedures including specific starting and completion dates.

ELIGIBILITY

Homebound and hospitalized instruction shall be provided when one or more of the following conditions applies:

  1. A physician has certified in writing that the child is unable to attend school for medical reasons and has stated the expected date the child will be able to return to the school program. Planning and Placement Team procedures are not necessary.
  2. The student is pregnant or has given birth and a physician has certified that homebound or hospitalized instruction is in the student’s best interest and should continue for a specified period of time. Planning and Placement Team procedures are not necessary.
  3. The child has a handicap so severe that it prevents the child from learning in a school setting, or the child’s presence in school endangers the health, safety or welfare of the child or others. The requirements of an evaluation, an individualized educational program and all Planning and Placement Team procedures are necessary.
  4. A special education program recommendation is pending and the child was at home at the time of referral. The requirements of an evaluation, an individualized educational program and all Planning and Placement Team procedures are necessary.

LOCATION OF INSTRUCTION

Instruction shall be provided in the setting of the child’s home or hospital to which the child is confined.

AMOUNT OF INSTRUCTION

The state does determine minimum instructional time for students eligible for homebound and hospital teaching. These requirements have been included for use in Meriden.

  1. Children in grades kindergarten through five shall be provided at least one hour per day or five hours per week. Generally, this amounts to one hour per week for each subject of reading, language arts, mathematics, science and social studies.
  2. Children in grades six through twelve shall be provided at least two hours per day or ten hours per week. Generally, this amounts to two hours for each subject in the child’s regular program.
  3. Instruction will be provided only on days that school is in session.

The school staff (the administrator, counselor, teachers and other support staff) work in unison with the Pupil Personnel Office to establish and monitor the child’s specific instructional schedule.

Variations in the location or amount of instruction must be approved by the Pupil Personnel Office.

Pupil Grading

The homebound teacher is responsible for determining the grades and reporting to the parents, Pupil Personnel Office, the principal’s office of the student’s school for the specific time period covered by homebound instruction. A Report of Grades form must be completed at the close of any marking period or the end of the homebound period even if the instruction is only for a week. The grading system will be the same as that used in the school.

The key factor in determining a fair grade for the student is the cooperation and communication between the regular classroom and the homebound teachers. This is of particular importance when instruction has been split during the course of the term or the year. The integrity of each instructional period must be maintained in order to establish a true assessment of the pupil’s accomplishment.

The guidance counselor is responsible for monitoring pupil evaluation and, if a question arises, will make recommendations to the building principal and Coordinator of Pupil Personnel.

TEACHER SELECTION

The regular classroom teacher usually is asked to provide the homebound instruction. Exceptions generally are due to time restrictions or to meet an objective recommended by the Planning and Placement Team. The Pupil Personnel Office maintains a teacher listing form from which homebound instructors are selected.

TEACHER SALARY/PAYROLL

Instructors in the Homebound Program are paid an hourly rate as agreed to in the Agreement between the Meriden Board of Education and the Meriden Federation of Teachers.

Payment is on a monthly basis. On the last day of the month in which the homebound teacher instructs the student, the teacher sends duplicate copies of the Monthly Record of Home Instruction to the Office of Pupil Personnel Programs. This form is the basis for the teacher monthly payroll and verification of the student attendance register.

REFERRAL PROCESS AND PROCEDURES

The following procedures should serve as an overview and as a planning checklist for the Homebound Program. They are specific for children eligible for homebound instruction due to medical reasons or pregnancy and when a Planning and Placement Team meeting is not required. All Planning and Placement Team procedures are mandatory for children eligible for homebound instruction under special education legislation.

  1. School staff or parents notify Pupil Personnel Office that child seems to be eligible for homebound instruction.
  2. Pupil Personnel Office secures student information and sends request for recommendation to licensed physician. (Forms HB/T3 and HB/Ts)
  3. Student file initiated at Pupil Personnel Office. (Form HB/T3)
  4. After receiving verification of pupil eligibility, school is notified as counselor receives form to select teachers and coordinate instructional program and materials. (Form HB4)
  5. Social worker may send letter outlining available services if homebound instruction is necessitated by pregnancy. (Form HB5)
  6. Counselor returns teacher selection form to Pupil Personnel Office and additional teachers are hired as necessary.
  7. Pupil Personnel Office sends procedures, monthly record of homebound instruction and report of grades forms to homebound teacher. (Forms HB6, HB7, HB8)
  8. Homebound teachers coordinate instruction with regular school staff through the child’s guidance counselor.
  9. Pupil Personnel Office sends list of suggestions to parents of child receiving homebound instruction. (Forms HB9, HB10)
  10. Homebound teacher telephones child’s parents to arrange teaching hours.
  11. Pupil Personnel Office notifies regular school to drop child from school register and places child on homebound register. (Form HB11)
  12. On the last day of the month in which the homebound teacher instructs the students, the teacher will send duplicate copies of the monthly record of homebound instruction (Form HB7) to the Office of Pupil Personnel. This initiates payroll procedures and provides as a basis for student attendance.
  13. The homebound teacher will complete the necessary grading procedures (Form HB8) at the close of homebound instruction or any marking period.
  14. Guidance counselor monitors ongoing program.
  15. Homebound teacher, counselor or parent must notify Pupil Personnel Office when physician or PPT gives student permission to return to school.
  16. Pupil Personnel Office notifies regular school of the date to add child to school register and drop from homebound register. (Form HB12)
  17. Homebound teacher completes grading procedures and sends to student’s home, school and Pupil Personnel Office.
  18. Counselor coordinates student’s transition to regular class.
Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HF2.1-R(3)

HOMEBOUND PROGRAM FORMS

6171.21 (R)

HOMEBOUND PROGRAM LISTING OF FORMS IN USE

1. Physician’s Letter

2. Physician’s Recommendation

3. Inter-office File

4. Request for Student Schedule and Teacher Assignment

5. Social Worker Letter for Pregnant Student

6. Teacher Instructions for Homebound

7. Monthly Record of Home Instruction

8. Report of Grades for Homebound Pupil

9. Parent Suggestion AND 10. Suggestions for Homebound Instructions

11. Notice to Drop from School Register

12. Notice to Add to School Register

REQUEST FOR HOMEBOUND INSTRUCTION OR TRANSPORTATION

Approved 5/1/1981
Previous Policy Number: HF2.1-E(3)

HOME INSTRUCTION

6172

HOME INSTRUCTION 6172

The Meriden Board of Education recognizes the right of parents to provide instruction for their children at home, in accordance with Connecticut General Statutes 10-184 and 10-220. The position of the Board of Education in this matter is to consider a request for home instruction in keeping with existing statutory authority and requirements.

Section 10-184 of the Connecticut General Statutes describes the duties of parents for educating their children. It requires that parents or persons having control of children five years of age and over and under eighteen years of age cause such children “...to attend a public school regularly...” Section 10-184 also allows the parent or person having control of such child to educate the child in other than the public schools if they are “able to show that the child is elsewhere receiving equivalent instruction in the studies taught in the public schools.”

The duties of local Boards of Education regarding home instruction are described in Section 10-220 of the Connecticut General Statutes. As part of their identified duties, local boards of education are required to “cause each child five years of age and over and under eighteen years of age who is not a high school graduate and is living in the school district to attend school in accordance with the provisions of Section 10-184.” If parents wish to educate their child in their home, they must show equivalency as described in Section 10-184, and it is the responsibility of the Meriden Board of Education to determine whether or not a child residing in Meriden would receive equivalent instruction as required by Section 10-220.

Legal References:

Connecticut General Statutes, Section 10-184

Connecticut General Statutes, Section 10-220

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HG3

NOTICE OF INTENT: INSTRUCTION OF STUDENT AT HOME

6172.3-E

View / download NOTICE OF INTENT: INSTRUCTION OF STUDENT AT HOME (printable PDF)

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HG3-E

PROCEDURES FOR HOME INSTRUCTION

6172.3-R

The Meriden Public Schools will utilize the following procedures in considering requests for home instruction:

  1. Parents must file, with the Superintendent of Schools, a State Department of Education Notice of Intent form which outlines basic information about the program to be provided to their child. A Notice of Intent will be effective for up to one school year. (see HG3-E)
  2. Filing must occur within ten days of the start of the home instruction program.
  3. When the school district receives the Notice of Intent, it will be checked for completeness and kept as part of the district’s permanent records. A complete form provides basic program information including name of teacher, subjects to be taught, days of instruction, and the teacher’s method of assessment.
  4. A parent, by filing a Notice of Intent, acknowledges full responsibility for the education of their child in accordance with the requirements of state law. Receipt of a Notice of Intent in no way constitutes approval by the school district of the content or effectiveness of a program of home instruction.
  5. If a parent fails to file a Notice of Intent or files an incomplete form, a certified letter shall be sent to the parent requesting compliance within ten days.
  6. An annual portfolio review will be held with the parents and school officials to determine if instruction in the required courses has been given.
  7. Any continued refusal by the parent to comply with the reasonable request of the school district for completion and filing of the Notice of Intent or to participate in an annual portfolio review may cause the child to be considered truant.
  8. The school district shall not accept nor require a Notice of Intent for any child younger than seven years or older than sixteen years of age.
  9. The school district shall provide a copy of the completed Notice of Intent signed by the Superintendent to the Bureau of Curriculum and Professional Development of the State Department of Education.
Approved 8/20/1991
Previous Policy Number: HG3-R

GUIDANCE PROGRAM

6178

GUIDANCE PROGRAM 6178

The Guidance Program shall assist students to develop a better understanding of themselves, realistically appraise their individual aptitudes and interests and be aware of educational and vocational opportunities.

Elementary Schools

Emphasis at this level will be placed on assisting children who exhibit difficulties in adjusting to school and who experience poor scholastic progress as a result. Students  are to be counseled on an individual or group basis as long as needs persist. Parent involvement is to be encouraged.

Middle Schools

Counseling emphasis at this level will be directed toward motivating underachieving students and assisting students with social and/or emotional needs. Students are to be exposed to a variety of vocational and educational opportunities to help them make appropriate choices for their next level of education.

High Schools

Attention will be given to the orientation of new students and course and program selection with particular emphasis on preparation and assistance for making college and vocational choices. Counseling services will also be provided on an individual and group basis for students with academic, social, and/or emotional problems.

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended:  December 6, 2016



Previous Policy Number: HJ

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HJ

EVALUATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS

6180

EVALUATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS 6180

Procedures for program evaluation shall be established and maintained. Elements of this evaluation may include:

nationally standardized general achievement tests, national standardized tests in specific areas, and tests administered by other agencies;

studies of students’ high school and dropout records;

evaluations by teachers and parents of student behaviors;

utilization of out-of-system services, participation in regional research studies, contracted evaluation services; and

systemwide criteria-reference tests keyed to local curriculum objectives.

It shall be the responsibility of the Superintendent to report the results of such program evaluation periodically to the Board.

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended December 6, 2016

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HM

GUIDELINES FOR PROGRAM EVALUATION

6180-R

Introduction

The Program Evaluation Model to be implemented in the Meriden Public Schools will be both goal oriented and decision oriented. The first segment will allow for the evaluation of student progress and the effectiveness of the educational program. The second segment will permit the information gathered to be used to facilitate judgments by those in a decision-making role.

The major objectives of the Program Evaluation Model are formulated to include process, product and context evaluation.

Objectives

  1. To assess the effectiveness of a program, as a whole and with various subgroups, in achieving its stated goals.
  2. To assess a program’s effectiveness compared with alternative programs.
  3. To assess the effectiveness of the methodologies and materials utilized within a program.
  4. To assess the effectiveness and suitability of the school facilities utilized in support of a program.
  5. To assess the cost-effectiveness of a program.
  6. To utilize evaluation results to implement program changes.
  7. To inform public groups of a program’s effectiveness.

View / download PROGRAM EVALUATION CYCLE (printable PDF)

Cross Reference:

Handbook of Educational Evaluation and Assistance

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HM-R

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

6180.1

The Superintendent, upon the advice of staff and with the approval of the Board, shall designate standards for admission to the various schools and programs, for promotion, and for graduation. No standard of scholarship shall be raised or lowered after the beginning of a school year so as to affect the standing or promotion of any pupil in that school year. All matters of promotion, class assignments and graduation shall be decided by the principals upon the advice of the pupils’ teachers and in accordance with approved standards.

Cross Reference:

Policy 5123 (Promotion and Retention, K-8)
Policy 5124 (Promotion and Retention, 9-12)
Policy 6146 (Graduation Requirements)

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HK

Examinations

6180.11

Teachers are encouraged to develop original and thorough examinations for the evaluation of the achievement of their students. Examinations should, where possible, include essay as well as objective questions.

Cross Reference:

Policy 6146.2 (Testing Programs)

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HK1

Guidelines for Examinations at the High School Level

6180.11 (R)

I. GOALS

  1. To measure the extent to which a student has met the minimum requirements for the course.
  2. To expose students who are going to further their education to examination situations.

II. OBJECTIVES

  1. To measure the long-term retention of course content as it reflects the course objectives.
  2. To organize what is most important from scattered materials into a meaningful whole, stressing relationships and giving perspective concerning what has been accomplished.
  3. To back up generalizations with details and/or develop generalizations from factual data.

III. PROCEDURES

A. The relationship between exams and course learner objectives.

  1. The exam should reflect the course learner objectives.

B. The value in terms of grade weight to be given to exams.

  1. The weight of final exams should generally be between 10-20% of the cumulative final grade, depending on whether the subject is academic or non-academic.
  2. A special location on the report card should be reserved to this grade, and this will be done on a trial basis for one year, and will be reviewed by administration.

C. Formats permissible for exams (other than paper and pencil tests).

  1. Lab practicals
  2. Oral (must be structured)
  3. Projects
  4. Suitable demonstrations

D. Departmental teacher discretion in administering or not administering exams.

  1. All teachers must give a final exam to students during the time scheduled.
  2. Teachers may choose to utilize alternate forms of evaluation such as projects and speeches.
  3. If specific circumstances dictate that an exam not be given, this decision must be approved by the principal.

E. The process to be used in the development, review and approval of the exams.

  1. Development - Teacher’s exam to reflect goals and objectives of the course.
  2. Review and Approval - The department chairperson will review and approve one week before exam date.
  3. An examination may not be given without prior department chairperson approval. Only the exam as approved by the department chairperson is to be administered.

F. That the mid-term exam schedule operate within the regular class time.

  1. Exams to take place during the regular period schedule and be cumulative for the terms one and two, at the discretion of the teacher.

G. These procedures to be reviewed and modified as required.

H. Tests and other vital instructional activities during the high Jewish holidays should be avoided.

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HK1-R

Progress Reports

6180.12

Progress Reports                                6180.12    

The issuance of grades or progress reports shall be made on a regular basis to promote a process of continuous evaluation of student performance and to provide a basis for bringing about change in student performance if such change is necessary.

Approved April 28, 1981

Reviewed and no changes made: December 6, 2016

Previous Policy Number: HK2

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HK2

Guidelines for Grading of Students

6180.12 (R)

Kindergarten Level

Kindergarten report cards are to be issued twice yearly, at the mid-year point and again at the end of the year. The kindergarten report card is intended to provide parents with information regarding the academic, social and developmental growth of their youngsters.

In addition, released time is to be provided in the fall for kindergarten teachers to conference with parents. The conferencing provides an opportunity for the teacher to review the students’ adjustment to kindergarten and other relevant issues.

Grades One through Five

Reporting procedures for grades one-five are detailed in the Elementary Reporting Procedures Manual. Parent reporting at these grade levels is carried on through the issuance of a report card as well as parent conferencing in the fall and spring.

Grades Six through Eight

Report cards at these grade levels are issued four times yearly. Students are to be graded in all academic subject areas as well as with regard to their effort.

Grades Nine through Twelve

Report cards are to be issued to high school students four times yearly. Students are to be graded in all course areas. Students may choose to be graded on a pass/fail basis in keeping with the procedures described in the Program of Studies Booklet.

Special Progress Reports (Grades 6-12)

Special Progress Reports are mailed to the parent at each mid-term. They may also be mailed at other times when a student’s performance changes significantly. These reports are used to notify parents when students are in danger of failing the marking period. Parents are urged to contact the teacher or team when these reports are received.

Special Progress Reports are also used in some cases to notify a parent or guardian that their child is doing very well. A student doing an outstanding job might well receive a Special Progress Report to let the parent know how well he/she is doing.

Approved 4/28/1981
Previous Policy Number: HK2-R

Honor Rolls

6180.13

Honor Rolls                                    6180.13

The Board encourages the use of honor rolls at appropriate grade levels as recognition of academic achievement.

Students shall be named to honor rolls in accordance with standards and procedures set by the Superintendent and published in the Program of Studies.

Cross Reference:

Policy 5126 (Awards and Scholarships)

 

Approved April 28, 1981

Amended December 6, 2016


Previous Policy Number: HK4

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number: HK4

Guidelines for Honor Rolls

6180.13 (R)

The purpose of an Honor Roll is to provide student recognition for academic achievement. Honor roll recognition will be given at the end of each marking period for students in grades six through twelve. Recognition may include the award of Honor Roll Certificates and Honor Rolls published in the local newspapers.

Grade Information
A+, 97-100 A, 93-96 A-, 90-92
B+, 87-89 B, 83-86 B-, 80-82
C+, 77-79 C, 73-76 C-, 70-72
D+, 67-69 D, 63-66 D-, 60-62
F, < 60 / Fail P, Pass I, Incomplete

MIDDLE SCHOOL

Honor roll recognition will be based upon the achievement of the following criteria during each honor roll interval:

  1. High Honors
    1. the student has no grade less than the "B" range, 80-89, in any subject that meets on a daily basis;
    2. the student has no more than one grade in the "B" range, 80-89, in any subject that meets on a daily basis;
    3. the student has no grade less than the "B" range, 80-89, in subjects that meet on less than a daily basis; and
    4. the student has no more than one grade in the "B" range, 80-89, in subjects that meet on less than a daily basis.
  2. Honors
    1. the student has no grade less than the "B" range, 80-89, in any subject that meets on a daily basis; and
    2. the student has no grade less than the "B" range, 80-89, in subjects that meet on less than a daily basis.

HIGH SCHOOL

Honor roll recognition will be based upon the achievement of the following criteria during each honor roll interval:

    1. Distinguished Honors:
      1. the student has a grade point average (GPA) of 4.00 or greater;
      2. the student has no grade less than the "C" range, 70-79, in any subject that meets on a daily basis;
      3. the student has no more than one grade in the "C" range, 70-79, in any subject that meets on a daily basis;
      4. the student has no grade less than the "C" range, 70-79 in subjects that meet on less than a daily basis;
      5. pass/fail and independent study courses are not considered in computing grade point averages for honor roll purposes; and
      6. no grade of incomplete
    2. High Honors:  Same as Distinguished Honors except GPA of 3.67-3.99
    3. Honors:  Same as Distinguished Honors except GPA of 3.00-3.66

The following quality point values are used in determining grade point averages (Classes 2010-2013):

Grade Honors Course All Other Courses
A 5.00 4.00
A- 4.67 3.67
B+ 4.33 3.33
B 4.00 3.00
B- 3.67 2.67
C+ 3.33 2.33
C 3.00 2.00
C- 2.67 1.67
D+ 2.33 1.33
D 2.00 1.00
D- 1.67 0.67
F 0.00 0.00

The following quality point values are used in determining grade point averages (Class of 2014):

Grade AP/UCONN ECE Accelerated / Honors Course Academic / All Other Courses
A+ 5.33 4.83 4.33
A 5.00 4.50 4.00
A- 4.67 4.16 3.67
B+ 4.33 3.83 3.33
B 4.00 3.50 3.00
B- 3.67 3.16 2.67
C+ 3.33 2.83 2.33
C 3.00 2.50 2.00
C- 2.67 2.16 1.67
D+ 2.33 1.83 1.33
D 2.00 1.50 1.00
D- 1.67 1.16 0.67
F 0.00 0.00 0.00

4. To compute a student's grade point average, the point value for each grade is multiplied by the number of times the subject meets per cycle. The total of these products is then divided by the sum of the times all subjects meet per cycle.

Approved 11/1/2012
Previous Policy Number: HK4-R

Standards for Daily Attendance and Participation

6180.21

Procedures outlined are intended to underscore the expectation of the Board and school administration that students be in attendance daily and participate in classroom activities. Regular, productive attendance is the cornerstone to education and key to student success in school and in life. Connecticut General Statutes 10-184 and 10-198 require that parents or guardians ensure school attendance for their children, and that school systems employ consistent and comprehensive procedures to monitor and reinforce attendance.

It is expected that parents will notify their child’s school of absence related to:

illness
infectious disease
family emergency
medical appointments which must occur during school hours
severe weather conditions
religious observances.

A parent may choose to excuse student absence; however, such authorization may not be made in the child’s best interest and may not be made legitimately as based on expectations noted above. Accordingly, the approval of the principal is also required to excuse student absence.

Guidelines

  1. Teachers and office staff will record daily attendance and indicate whether an absence is excused or unexcused.
  2. Parents are requested to notify the school by phone (by 8:00 a.m. - high school; 8:30 a.m. - middle school; 9:30 a.m. - elementary school) when a child is absent. They may request that school work be sent home.
  3. The school will attempt to verify absence by phone if a call is not received.
  4. Parents are to provide children with a written excuse for each absence within three (3) days of the child’s return.
  5. The first instance of unauthorized absence (truancy) will result in a school conference scheduled with the principal (or designee), the parent and the child.
  6. All work missed due to absence must be completed by the student. A child absent without parent authorization will be required to make up time and work after school hours. (Does not apply to students in grades 9-12.)
  7. Students displaying patterns of poor attendance (four or more instances of truancy) will be referred to the school’s child study/at-risk team for case review, intervention and management. Students will be added to the caseload of the attendance counselor or outreach worker.
  8. Subsequent absences will result in a home visit and conference with the parent to reinforce school attendance and to assist in overcoming barriers to regular school attendance.
  9. Since poor school attendance can be associated with educationally handicapping conditions, students who evidence academic difficulty associated with the possible presence of a disability will be referred to Planning and Placement Team for evaluation.
  10. 10. Continued absence will result in school initiation of a referral for truancy (4-10 unexcused absences) or habitual truancy (20 unexcused absences) to the Superior Court for Juvenile Matters. A referral to the Department of Children and Families will also be made on the grounds of educational neglect for children under age 11.

Tardiness

  • Students who arrive to school tardy must report to the office in order to be admitted to class.
  • School administration will validate excused tardiness. Students found to be willfully tardy in avoidance of school or class may be subject to sanctions outlined under guidelines for attendance.

Additional High School Guidelines

  1. A valid absence is one for which the student has school or parent permission. A student will be considered truant if the school confirms that the student is absent without parent permission or knowledge.
  2. Absence from class will be considered a class cut and truant behavior unless the student presents a valid excuse or pass to that teacher by the next school day.
  3. Attendance will be taken every class period and absence noted to the office.
  4. Students will not be permitted makeup opportunities for daily participation requirements unless there is an authorized excuse for the absence.
  5. Course curricula and grading will reflect application of department standards for daily classwork, quizzes, tests and class participation. Work and participation missed as a result of truancy will be assigned zeros. No alternative assignments or extra credit/makeup work may be applied to negate the effect of zeros accumulated through truancy upon grade average.
  6. Course standards will be printed and distributed to each student and reviewed at the beginning of each marking period.
  7. Students may appeal decisions related to authorization of absence to the school administration. Matters not resolved at the building level will be referred to the Associate Superintendent for Instruction.
Approved 5/2/1995
Previous Policy Number: HK-R

HIGH SCHOOL TRANSFER CREDIT GUIDELINES

6181

HIGH SCHOOL TRANSFER CREDIT GUIDELINES 6181

The Meriden Board of Education Policy utilizes consistent guidelines to properly evaluate students transferring to the Meriden high schools from our middle schools and from out of the district.

All transfer students will be held accountable, to the extent possible, for the completion of specific courses required by the Meriden Board of Education.

  1. All credit earned at the student’s former high school, grades 9-12, will be accepted.
  2. High school credits earned prior to grade 9 at an educational institution other than  the Meriden Public Schools will only count toward the minimum high school credit graduation requirement if the student's transcript reflects that high school credit was earned.
  3. Transferring students will be placed in the appropriate grade level according to Meriden’s credit requirements for promotion.
  4. Students transferring from schools operating on a semester course basis must make up credit deficiencies in courses such as English 9-12, biology, U.S. History and certain mathematics courses by repeating the entire course since these particular courses are offered only on a full year basis in Meriden. The previously earned partial credits in these specific courses will be considered as elective credits.
  5. Students transferring from out of district with credit deficiencies in physical education must make up such deficiencies provided, however, that a student entering Meriden Public Schools in grade 12 with physical education credit deficiencies will not be required to take more than one semester of physical education during his or her senior year.

Students who have been excused from physical education for medical or religious reasons will not have to make up the course, but will still have to earn the full credit units for graduation by earning other elective credits.

Approved February 1989

Amended March 6, 2007

Approved March 6, 2007

Amended December 6, 2016

Previous Policy Number: HK5.2-R (2)

 

Approved 12/6/2016
Previous Policy Number:

Policy Regarding High School Credits Earned in 7th and 8th Grade

6182

Policy Regarding High School Credits Earned in 7th and 8th Grade 6182

Only courses taken in grades nine to twelve, inclusive, shall satisfy the high school graduation requirements of Meriden Public Schools. However, a student attending seventh or eighth grade in Meriden Public Schools who has earned a passing grade of 60 or higher in a course that corresponds directly to the subject matter of the high school level equivalent shall have such credit counted for high school graduation requirements.  The determination of whether the course corresponds directly to the high school level equivalent shall be made by the Superintendent of Schools or his/her designee.

 

Adopted April 28, 1981

Amended December 6, 2016

Amended October 15, 2019

 

 

Previous Policy Number: HK5.2-R (2)



Approved 10/15/2019
Previous Policy Number: HK5.2-R(2)

STUDENT ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY

6200

STUDENT ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY                                                                      6200

Computers, computer networks, electronic devices, Internet access, and email are effective and important technological resources.  The Board of Education may provide computers, a computer network, including Internet access, and an email system, as well as other electronic devices that access the network(s), referred collectively as the “computer systems.”  The Board of Education and the Administration believe in the educational value of such computer systems as technological resources and recognize their potential to support our curriculum by expanding resources available for staff and student use.  The Meriden Board of Education provides these computer systems in order to enhance the educational opportunities for students and the business operations of the school district.

Terms of Use

  1. Acceptable Use: Student access to the District's computer systems must be solely for education-related purposes. Use of the computer systems will be allowed only for students who act in a considerate and responsible manner in using such systems. 
  2. Privileges: The District’s technological resources are expensive to purchase, install, and maintain. As such, use of these technological resources is a privilege, not a right, and violations of standards of conduct required by this policy may result in a revocation of access privileges and/or discipline in accordance with the Board’s student discipline policy.  Students will be required to adhere to certain policies and procedures, as outlined below.  The appropriate building principal may make all decisions regarding whether or not a user has authorization to use any and all of these resources and may deny, revoke, or suspend access at any time; his or her decision is final.
  3. Monitoring: Students are responsible for good behavior on school computer systems just as they are in other school settings.  General school rules for behavior and communications apply.  It is expected that users will comply with district standards and will act in a responsible and legal manner, at all times in accordance with district standards, state, and federal laws. 

It is important that students and parents/guardians understand that the district, as the owner of the computer systems, reserves the right to monitor and review the use of these computer systems.  The district intends to monitor and review in a limited fashion, but will do so as needed to ensure that the systems are being used for district-related educational purposes.

As part of the monitoring and reviewing process, the district will retain the capacity to bypass any individual password of a student or other user.  The system’s security aspects, such as personal passwords and the message delete function for email can be bypassed for these purposes.  All users must be aware that they should not have any expectation of personal privacy in the use of these computer systems. 

  1. Unacceptable Use: Students are permitted to use the district’s computer systems for legitimate educational purposes.  The user is responsible for his or her actions and activities involving the network. Conduct which constitutes inappropriate use includes, but is not limited to, the following:
  2. Using the computer networks for any activity that is generally prohibited by law, by Board policy, or school rules or regulations. Use of these computer systems for the purpose of carrying out such behavior or activity is prohibited.
  3. Sending any form of harassing, threatening, or intimidating message, at any time, to any person (such communications may also be a crime).
  4. Gaining or seeking to gain unauthorized access to computer systems.
  5. Damaging computers, computer files, computer systems, or computer networks.
  6. Downloading or modifying computer software of the district in violation of the district’s licensure agreement(s) and/or without authorization from a teacher or administrator.
  7. Using another person’s password under any circumstances.
  8. Trespassing in or tampering with any other person’s folders, work, or files.
  9. Sending any message that breaches the district’s confidentiality requirements, or the confidentiality of students.
  10. Sending any copyrighted material over the system.
  11. Using computer systems for any personal purpose, or in a manner that interferes with the district’s educational programs.
  12. Accessing or attempting to access any material that is obscene, contains child pornography, or is harmful to minors.
  13. Transmitting or receiving email communications or accessing information on the Internet for non-educational purposes.
  14.  
  15. Accessing or attempting to access social networking sites (i.e., Facebook, Twitter, Myspace, etc.) without a legitimate educational purpose.

Misuse of the computer systems, or violations of this policy, may result in loss of access to such computer systems as well as other disciplinary action up to and including suspension and/or expulsion, depending on the specific conduct.

Anyone who is aware of problems with, or misuse of, the computer systems, or has a question regarding the proper use thereof, should report this to his or her teacher or principal immediately.  The Board and Administration urge any student who receives any harassing, threatening, intimidating, or other improper message through the computer systems to report it immediately.  It is the Board’s policy that no student should be required to tolerate such treatment, regardless of the identity of the sender of the message.  Please report such events.

 

  1. Internet Safety:

 

The Administration will take measures to: assure the safety and security of students when using forms of direct electronic communications; prohibit unauthorized access, including “hacking” and other unlawful activities by minors online; to prohibit unauthorized disclosure, use, and dissemination of personally identifiable information regarding students; to education minor students about appropriate online behavior, including interacting with other individuals on social networking websites and in chat rooms and cyber-bulling awareness and response; and to restrict students’ access to online materials harmful to minors, including obscene materials and child pornography. 

            The district will provide supervision for students while they are using district computer systems in order to promote students' compliance with the foregoing terms and conditions for use. Decisions regarding supervision of use will be made in the judgment of the administration, based upon factors such as, but not limited to, the age of the students using the district's computer systems, and the circumstances of such use.

            The Board will implement a technology protection measure to block or filter Internet access to visual depictions that contain obscene material, contain child pornography, or are harmful to minors, and ensure that such filtering technology is operative during computer use by minor students.

Legal References:

Conn. Gen. Stat. § 10-221

Conn. Gen. Stat. §§ 53a-182b; 53a-183; 53a-250 et seq. (computer-related offenses)

Conn. Gen. Stat. § 53a-194 (definition of obscene)

Children's Internet Protection Act, Pub. L. 106-554, codified at 47 U.S.C. § 254(h)

Electronic Communication Privacy Act of 1986, Pub. L. 99-508, codified at 18 U.S.C. §§ 2510-2520

Protecting Children in the 21st Century Act, Pub. L. 110-385, codified at 47 U.S.C. § 254(h)(5)(B)(iii)

Every Student Succeeds Act, Pub. L. 114-95, codified at 20 U.S.C. § 6301 et seq.

18 U.S.C. § 2256 (definition of child pornography)

Miller v. California, 413 U.S. 15 (1973) (definition of obscene)

 

Approved October 9, 2001

Amended March 23, 2004

Amended November 21, 2017

 

Previous Policy Number HH1.3R and 6141.3211-R

 

Approved 11/21/2017
Previous Policy Number: 6141.3211-R and HH1.3R

AUP Student Cover Letter

6200.1(E)

 

Click link to view the Student Acceptable User Policy Cover letter: AUP Student Cover Letter

 

Approved 11/21/2017
Previous Policy Number: HH1.3R, 6141.3211-R

Student Acceptable Use Agreement

6200.2 (E)

 

Click on the link to view the Student Acceptable Use Agreement.

 

/uploads/6200_2-E_AUP_Agreement_Form.pdf

Approved 11/21/2017
Previous Policy Number: HH1.3R, and 6141.3221-R

INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES EDUCATION ACT-ALTERNATIVE ASSESSMENTS FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES FOR STATEWIDE AND DISTRICT-WIDE ASSESSMENTS

6300

INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES EDUCATION ACT - ALTERNATIVE ASSESSMENTS FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES FOR STATEWIDE AND DISTRICT-WIDE ASSESSMENTS

 

            The Meriden Board of Education  will, in all respects, comply with the requirements of state and federal law with regard to the special education of students with disabilities.  Decisions about whether a student with a disability eligible for special education and related services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act shall participate in alternative assessment(s) to particular statewide or district-wide assessments shall be made by each student’s planning and placement team in accordance with applicable state and federal law.

 

 

Legal References:

 

            Conn. Gen. Stat. § 10-14q

 

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 42 U.S.C. § 1400, et seq. (IDEA)

34 C.F.R. § 300.320

 

Connecticut Alternate Assessment (CTAA) Test Administration Manual, Published December 9, 2016, http://ct.portal.airast.org/wp-content/uploads/CTAA_Test-Administration-Manual.pdf

 

CTAA and Alternate Science Learner Characteristics Inventory (LCI), http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/student_assessment/special_education/LCI.pdf

 

 

ADOPTED:    December 18, 2018

Approved 12/18/2018
Previous Policy Number: